Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

An Item has_many Pieces. I have two methods, one that finds out if the Piece is available and one that finds out if an Item has available pieces.

  # in piece.rb
  def available?(current_user, piece)
    if piece.status == 1
      true
    elsif piece.status == 2
      false
    elsif piece.status == 3
      true if piece.friend_id == current_user.id
    end
  end

  #in item.rb
  def available?(current_user, user, item)
    false
      item.pieces.each do |piece|
        if piece.available?(current_user, piece)
          true
        end
      end
  end

My available? method in Item is wrong. I want it to return true if an Item has available pieces, and false if not. Theory behind my code is that the method returns false unless there is a piece that returns true. When I do it in the console all I get are the pieces in a hash, not true or false.

Can anyone solve my problem or tell me a better way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
this seems just wrong: Piece#available?(current_user, piece). why is piece again an argument? it's another piece? same for Item. – tokland Nov 12 '12 at 12:47
    
No its the item, in other words, is the item available based on its pieces. Thanks for your help! – Dol Nov 14 '12 at 17:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you need to check whether item has at least one available piece, the method can look like this:

def available?(current_user, user, item)
  item.pieces.each do |piece|
    return true if piece.available?(current_user, piece)
  end
  false
end
share|improve this answer
    
Definitely a better way. Thanks!! – Dol Nov 12 '12 at 11:05
4  
that's Enumerate#any? – tokland Nov 12 '12 at 12:24
def available?(current_user, user, item)
  item.pieces.any? do |piece|
    piece.available?(current_user, piece)
  end
end
share|improve this answer

Inferring from your code I think that available? method in Piece.rb doesn't need a second argument of piece because it's an instance method of Piece. So I suggest you refactor the method to:

def available_to?(current_user)
  if status == 1
    true
  elsif status == 2
    false
  elsif status == 3
    true if friend_id == current_user.id
  end
end

It will give you a more clean interface.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for mentioning that piece is present twice (which makes little sense). Note however that the expression you wrote can be improved: 1) true if friend_id == current_user.id -> friend_id == current_user.id. 2) It can be re-written as a very simple boolean expression: status == 1 || (status == 3 && friend_id == current_user.id). – tokland Nov 12 '12 at 13:13
    
yeah, that's right and that's why ruby is so great =) one can refactor a bunch of if-statements in a one line of code – tokenvolt Nov 12 '12 at 13:36
    
I know it needs a refactor, I'm just struggling to get my head around the whole thing still. An item is available if it has at least one available piece. Can I use the method in Piece for item too? – Dol Nov 14 '12 at 17:34
1  
Yeah, available method of Item also doesn't need arguments user, because it's never used, and item, because again it's the instance method and you can access Item object through self. So you can use the method which tokland wrote in his answer, but just delete user and item arguments. It should look like this: def available?(current_user) pieces.any? do |piece| piece.available?(current_user) end end – tokenvolt Nov 14 '12 at 21:34
    
tokenvolt and tokland - Thanks – Dol Nov 15 '12 at 14:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.