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I have HTML looks like:

<div class="group_box">
  <div>
     <div>
       ... <!-- I don't know haw many div's here -- >
       <a class="mark_as_read" ...>
     </div>
  </div>
<div>

....

<div class="group_box">
  <div>
     <div>
       ... <!-- I don't know haw many div's here -- >
       <a class="mark_as_read" ...>
     </div>
  </div>
<div>

I want to hide parent "group_box" when user click on "mark_as_read".

Something like this:

<script type="text/javascript">
  $().ready(function() {
    $('.mark_as_read_link').bind('click', function() {
      alert($(self));
      $(self).parent('.group_box').hide();
      return false;
    });
 });
</script>

But it doesn't work. I have not idea what is $(this) in this case....

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1  
console.log() to the rescue. You could put console.log( $(this) ); for example inside the click event, and developer tools console would show you which item was clicked. –  Joonas Nov 12 '12 at 11:25
    
Thanks, it is Window. –  demas Nov 12 '12 at 11:27
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of .parent() you can use the .closest() method, which will traverse up the DOM until it finds an element that match the selector.

<script type="text/javascript">
  $().ready(function() {
    $('.mark_as_read_link').on('click', function() {
      $(this).closest('.group_box').hide();
      return false;
    });
 });
</script>

In the example I use .on() instead of .bind(). As of jQuery 1.7, .bind() has been deprecated in favor of .on() for attaching event listeners.

Update:

As Joonas points out in his comment, it would be possible to use the .parents() method, instead of .closest() as suggested above. The difference is that .parents() will keep traversing up the DOM, even if it encounter an element that matches the selector, while .closest() will stop traversing as soon as it finds a match. In this case I believe .closest() is more suited for the purpose, but if you consider using .parents() instead, here are the differences, stated in the documentation:

.closest()

  • Begins with the current element
  • Travels up the DOM tree until it finds a match for the supplied selector
  • The returned jQuery object contains zero or one element for each element in the original set

.parents()

  • Begins with the parent element
  • Travels up the DOM tree to the document's root element, adding each ancestor element to a temporary collection; it then filters that collection based on a selector if one is supplied
  • The returned jQuery object contains zero or more elements for each element in the original set
share|improve this answer
1  
There is also .parents() api.jquery.com/parents –  Joonas Nov 12 '12 at 11:27
    
@Joonas Yes, that is correct. However, .parents() traverses up the DOM until it reaches the root element, even if it find an element that matches the selector earlier. In this case, I don't think that would be the desired behavior. –  Christofer Eliasson Nov 12 '12 at 11:29
    
You got a point.. –  Joonas Nov 12 '12 at 12:18
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You have to use jQuery function closest(). It returns the closest parent:

<script type="text/javascript">
  $(document).ready(function() {
    $('.mark_as_read_link').click(function(){
      $(this).closest('.group_box').hide();
      return false;
    });
 });
</script>

ps $(self) makes no sense. Use $(this) for the current element

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for $(this). –  demas Nov 12 '12 at 11:35
add comment

onYou something like this

<script type="text/javascript">
   $().ready(function() {
     $("body").on('click','.mark_as_read', function() {
         $(this).closest('.group_box').hide();
        return false;
      });
   });

Instead use On ,bind is deprecated

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