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This is the table I have:

CREATE TABLE `person` (
  `id` bigint(10) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(20) DEFAULT NULL,
  `age` int(10) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `age` (`age`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=10000 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

This is the output of explain:

mysql> explain select * from person order by age\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: person
         type: ALL
possible_keys: NULL
          key: NULL
      key_len: NULL
          ref: NULL
         rows: 10367
        Extra: Using filesort
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

What's going on? Why isn't MySQL using the age index to do the sorting? I tried doind analyze table, but it didn't make any difference.

Just for reference, here's the distribution of data in the table:

mysql> select age, count(*) from person group by age;
+-----+----------+
| age | count(*) |
+-----+----------+
|  21 |     1250 |
|  22 |     1216 |
|  23 |     1278 |
|  24 |     1262 |
|  25 |     1263 |
|  26 |     1221 |
|  27 |     1239 |
|  28 |     1270 |
+-----+----------+
8 rows in set (0.04 sec)

UPDATE

@grisha seems to think that you can't select a field not in the index. That doesn't seem to make any sense, however, it looks like the following works:

mysql> explain select age from person order by age \G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: person
         type: index
possible_keys: NULL
          key: age
      key_len: 4
          ref: NULL
         rows: 10367
        Extra: Using index
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

And also if I add an index that covers all the field it works as well:

mysql> alter table person add key `idx1` (`age`, `id`, `name`);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.29 sec)
Records: 0  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> explain select * from person order by age\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: person
         type: index
possible_keys: NULL
          key: idx1
      key_len: 35
          ref: NULL
         rows: 10367
        Extra: Using index
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

@eggyal suggested using index hints. This seems to work as well, and is probably the correct answer:

mysql> explain select * from person force key for order by (age) order by age\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: person
         type: index
possible_keys: NULL
          key: age
      key_len: 4
          ref: NULL
         rows: 10367
        Extra: 
1 row in set (0.02 sec)
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried to supply an index hint: select * from person FORCE KEY FOR ORDER BY (age) order by age? –  eggyal Nov 12 '12 at 12:14
1  
@eggyal: The index hint works, but I'm baffled as to why I need it. –  itsadok Nov 12 '12 at 12:25
    
@eggyal is not true, filesort is badly named. Anytime a sort can’t be performed from an index, it’s a filesort. It has nothing to do with files. Filesort should be called sort. What @grisha said is correct –  ajreal Nov 12 '12 at 12:30
    
op, s.petrunia.net/blog/?p=24 –  ajreal Nov 12 '12 at 12:34
    
@ajreal: I never said filesort was otherwise: only that an index-based sort should be used here. –  eggyal Nov 12 '12 at 12:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Index can help you in sorting, when you select only index column. In your case you select *, therefore mysql doesn't use index.

Why usually index can't help in sorting ?

If we want to sort some table t by field my_field using index on my_field, we will do :

for each my_field f in index, do :
    get all records where my_field = f and add to result
return result

Assuming not clustered index, the above will execute as many random I/O's as the number of rows in t(might be huge), whereas simple external sorting algorithm will read the data by blocks/pages sequentially and will execute much less random I/O's.

So, of course you can say to db : "I want to do sorting using index", but it's really not efficient.

share|improve this answer
1  
@grisha, first of all, it seems strange that the DB would do all the sorting work when it already has a sorted list in the form of an index. Second, if I add an index hint it does work, which makes me think that MySQL simply thinks that the table is too small to bother with the index. I'm no expert, so I hope some consensus will be reached here. –  itsadok Nov 12 '12 at 12:53
1  
@Grisha: I'm sorry, but your latest update is even less correct than your original answer. Reading an index, in-order, is not "random I/O". Performing a full table-scan and sorting the results will however result in considerable "random I/O" (certainly the disk may be read sequentially, but records must then be reordered which will require considerable random access). Your summary that index-based sort is "really not efficient" flies in the face of the MySQL documentation on optimising ORDER BY. –  eggyal Nov 12 '12 at 14:09
1  
@eggyal - I didn't say that "Reading an index, in-order" will cost random I/O. You will pay random I/O per row, when you fetch the record from disk - you have to do it, because you don't have all the fields in index. –  Grisha Nov 12 '12 at 14:18
1  
@MarcAlff: filesort is going to be O(n log n), or worse. You're seriously suggesting that, for 10367 records, this is cheaper than an index-based sort? The very fact that the OP came here wondering why his index wasn't being used suggests that filesort was giving poor performance. The fact that an index hint gives better performance suggests that reading the index and seeking randomly into the table is better than filesort after all. The only question is why one needs to give such a hint: MySQL should be selecting the index of its own accord. –  eggyal Nov 12 '12 at 14:54
1  
@eggyal, "The very fact that the OP came here wondering why his index wasn't being used suggests that filesort was giving poor performance." ... not necessarily, that is a valid question by itself. Beside, where do you see benchmark results ? The edits posted show that using FORCE INDEX or a covering index cause the index to be used, not that is it faster. –  Marc Alff Nov 12 '12 at 15:43

You could just resolve not to use data in that table. Or create scads of left most covered indexes across every column in every table!

share|improve this answer
    
I suppose he could also resolve not to use an RDBMS. Or indeed, a computer. Why not keep all the records in a filing cabinet and sort through them by hand? –  eggyal Nov 12 '12 at 13:07

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