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I need to convert strings which contain the memory usage in bytes, like: 1048576 (which is 1M) into exactly that, a human-readable version, and visa-versa.

Note: I looked here already: Reusable library to get human readable version of file size?

And here (even though it isn't python): How to convert human readable memory size into bytes?

Nothing so far helped me, so I looked elsewhere.

I have found something that does this for me here: http://code.google.com/p/pyftpdlib/source/browse/trunk/test/bench.py?spec=svn984&r=984#137 or, for shorter URL: http://goo.gl/zeJZl

The Code:

def bytes2human(n, format="%(value)i%(symbol)s"):
    """
    >>> bytes2human(10000)
    '9K'
    >>> bytes2human(100001221)
    '95M'
    """
    symbols = ('B', 'K', 'M', 'G', 'T', 'P', 'E', 'Z', 'Y')
    prefix = {}
    for i, s in enumerate(symbols[1:]):
        prefix[s] = 1 << (i+1)*10
    for symbol in reversed(symbols[1:]):
        if n >= prefix[symbol]:
            value = float(n) / prefix[symbol]
            return format % locals()
    return format % dict(symbol=symbols[0], value=n)

And also a function for conversion the other way (same site):

def human2bytes(s):
    """
    >>> human2bytes('1M')
    1048576
    >>> human2bytes('1G')
    1073741824
    """
    symbols = ('B', 'K', 'M', 'G', 'T', 'P', 'E', 'Z', 'Y')
    letter = s[-1:].strip().upper()
    num = s[:-1]
    assert num.isdigit() and letter in symbols
    num = float(num)
    prefix = {symbols[0]:1}
    for i, s in enumerate(symbols[1:]):
        prefix[s] = 1 << (i+1)*10
    return int(num * prefix[letter])

This is great and all, but it has some information loss, example:

>>> bytes2human(10000)
'9K'
>>> human2bytes('9K')
9216

To try to solve this, I change the formatting on the function bytes2human

Into: format="%(value).3f%(symbol)s")

Which is much nicer, giving me these results:

>>> bytes2human(10000)
'9.766K'

but when I try to convert them back with the human2bytes function:

>>> human2bytes('9.766K')

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#366>", line 1, in <module>
    human2bytes('9.766K')
  File "<pyshell#359>", line 12, in human2bytes
    assert num.isdigit() and letter in symbols
AssertionError

This is because of the .

So my question is, how can I convert a human-readable version back into byte-version, without data-loss?

Note: I know that 3 decimal places is also a little bit of data loss. But for the purposes of this question, lets ignore that for now, I can always change that to something greater.

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2 Answers 2

You are pretty much answering your own question in your last note, there.

In human2bytes(s), the input string -- 9.766K for example -- is split up in two parts, the number and the prefix. After the assertion (which as you correctly observe is what throws the error), the number is multiplied by the corresponding value that the prefix represents, so 9.766 * 1000 = 9766. The only way to "avoid" data loss is to accept a sufficiently precise floating-point value as input.

In order to make human2bytes accept floating-point input, you could either remove num.isdigit() from the assertion and then wrap the typecasting num = float(num) with try-except, or check it by some other means.

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+1 for raising the point about precise floating-point value. You basically can't perform a symmetrical translation between the two - the human readable form truncates values for the sake of brevity. –  synthesizerpatel Nov 12 '12 at 13:11
up vote 3 down vote accepted

So it turns out the answer was much simpler than I thought - one of the links that I provided actually led to a much more detailed version of the function:

Which is able to deal with any scope I give it.

But thank you for your help:

The code copied here for posterity:

## {{{ http://code.activestate.com/recipes/578019/ (r15)
#!/usr/bin/env python

"""
Bytes-to-human / human-to-bytes converter.
Based on: http://goo.gl/kTQMs
Working with Python 2.x and 3.x.

Author: Giampaolo Rodola' <g.rodola [AT] gmail [DOT] com>
License: MIT
"""

# see: http://goo.gl/kTQMs
SYMBOLS = {
    'customary'     : ('B', 'K', 'M', 'G', 'T', 'P', 'E', 'Z', 'Y'),
    'customary_ext' : ('byte', 'kilo', 'mega', 'giga', 'tera', 'peta', 'exa',
                       'zetta', 'iotta'),
    'iec'           : ('Bi', 'Ki', 'Mi', 'Gi', 'Ti', 'Pi', 'Ei', 'Zi', 'Yi'),
    'iec_ext'       : ('byte', 'kibi', 'mebi', 'gibi', 'tebi', 'pebi', 'exbi',
                       'zebi', 'yobi'),
}

def bytes2human(n, format='%(value).1f %(symbol)s', symbols='customary'):
    """
    Convert n bytes into a human readable string based on format.
    symbols can be either "customary", "customary_ext", "iec" or "iec_ext",
    see: http://goo.gl/kTQMs

      >>> bytes2human(0)
      '0.0 B'
      >>> bytes2human(0.9)
      '0.0 B'
      >>> bytes2human(1)
      '1.0 B'
      >>> bytes2human(1.9)
      '1.0 B'
      >>> bytes2human(1024)
      '1.0 K'
      >>> bytes2human(1048576)
      '1.0 M'
      >>> bytes2human(1099511627776127398123789121)
      '909.5 Y'

      >>> bytes2human(9856, symbols="customary")
      '9.6 K'
      >>> bytes2human(9856, symbols="customary_ext")
      '9.6 kilo'
      >>> bytes2human(9856, symbols="iec")
      '9.6 Ki'
      >>> bytes2human(9856, symbols="iec_ext")
      '9.6 kibi'

      >>> bytes2human(10000, "%(value).1f %(symbol)s/sec")
      '9.8 K/sec'

      >>> # precision can be adjusted by playing with %f operator
      >>> bytes2human(10000, format="%(value).5f %(symbol)s")
      '9.76562 K'
    """
    n = int(n)
    if n < 0:
        raise ValueError("n < 0")
    symbols = SYMBOLS[symbols]
    prefix = {}
    for i, s in enumerate(symbols[1:]):
        prefix[s] = 1 << (i+1)*10
    for symbol in reversed(symbols[1:]):
        if n >= prefix[symbol]:
            value = float(n) / prefix[symbol]
            return format % locals()
    return format % dict(symbol=symbols[0], value=n)

def human2bytes(s):
    """
    Attempts to guess the string format based on default symbols
    set and return the corresponding bytes as an integer.
    When unable to recognize the format ValueError is raised.

      >>> human2bytes('0 B')
      0
      >>> human2bytes('1 K')
      1024
      >>> human2bytes('1 M')
      1048576
      >>> human2bytes('1 Gi')
      1073741824
      >>> human2bytes('1 tera')
      1099511627776

      >>> human2bytes('0.5kilo')
      512
      >>> human2bytes('0.1  byte')
      0
      >>> human2bytes('1 k')  # k is an alias for K
      1024
      >>> human2bytes('12 foo')
      Traceback (most recent call last):
          ...
      ValueError: can't interpret '12 foo'
    """
    init = s
    num = ""
    while s and s[0:1].isdigit() or s[0:1] == '.':
        num += s[0]
        s = s[1:]
    num = float(num)
    letter = s.strip()
    for name, sset in SYMBOLS.items():
        if letter in sset:
            break
    else:
        if letter == 'k':
            # treat 'k' as an alias for 'K' as per: http://goo.gl/kTQMs
            sset = SYMBOLS['customary']
            letter = letter.upper()
        else:
            raise ValueError("can't interpret %r" % init)
    prefix = {sset[0]:1}
    for i, s in enumerate(sset[1:]):
        prefix[s] = 1 << (i+1)*10
    return int(num * prefix[letter])


if __name__ == "__main__":
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()
## end of http://code.activestate.com/recipes/578019/ }}}
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