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The title is pretty much it...

Why would you ever want to use the constructor constraint?

It's clearly implied by the class constraint.

If you use it alone, you can't do anything with the thing you've created.

Why does it even exist?

Additional info:

Just as a note, the following code doesn't compile until you add the "constructor" constraint:

program Project3;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  System.SysUtils;


type
  TSomeClass<T: class> = class
    function GetType: T;
  end;


{ TSomeClass<T> }

function TSomeClass<T>.GetType: T;
begin
  Result := T.Create;
end;

begin
  try
    { TODO -oUser -cConsole Main : Insert code here }
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
end.
share|improve this question
1  
Related, Generics: What's a “CONSTRUCTOR constraint”?. – LU RD Nov 12 '12 at 14:31
2  
It's pretty much useless because it has to be parameterless. – David Heffernan Nov 12 '12 at 15:09
    
After the above added code, it seems to me that the class constraint should imply the constructor constraint. – Nick Hodges Nov 13 '12 at 3:03
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Why would you ever want to use the constructor constraint?

It's clearly implied by the class constraint.

No it's not. The constructor constraint requires that the type has a public, parameterless constructor - and then allows that constructor to be called.

Not all classes have a public parameterless constructor.

share|improve this answer
1  
But why would you care? (and I must say it is an honor to have my question answered by the immortal Jon Skeet!) – Nick Hodges Nov 12 '12 at 12:48
1  
@NickHodges If type has constructor constraint then e.g. you can write T.Create. – Linas Nov 12 '12 at 13:02
    
@Linas -- Yeah, I know. I'm just wondering why you'd care. I'm guessing it might be for the purposes of a Factory or something like that, but I'm just wondering what the "official" reason is. – Nick Hodges Nov 12 '12 at 13:25
1  
@NickHodges: You'd care precisely because in factory cases etc you may well want to create a new instance. You care because it allows you to do something which you otherwise can't do. – Jon Skeet Nov 12 '12 at 13:45
    
@JonSkeet could you please give an simple example of a class not having a public parameterless constructor, that cannot be used with a generic class TFoo<T:class, constructor>? – Sir Rufo Nov 13 '12 at 23:54

IMHO the official reason for that constraint is that the compiler can't handle it actually by himself.

It is just a flag for the compiler which can also be set by himself, because the compiler does recognizes the fact, that we need a constructor constraint. So it could be handled automatically by the compiler, because the Generic class will be compiled before using that class.

Maybe we will get it with XE9

UPDATE

If TComponent is accepted as a class type without a public parameterless constructor then the constructor constraint is useless, because this (extended sample from Nick) compiles and produces a TComponent Instance. Of course it will not call the original constructor TComponent.Create( AOwner : TComponent ), instead TObject.Create is called, but you have a TComponent Instance.

program Project3;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  System.SysUtils, System.Classes;

type
  TSomeClass<T: class, constructor> = class
    function GetType: T;
  end;

{ TSomeClass<T> }

function TSomeClass<T>.GetType: T;
begin
  Result := T.Create;
end;

var
  SomeClass : TSomeClass<TComponent>;
  Component : TComponent;
begin
  try
    SomeClass := TSomeClass<TComponent>.Create;
    Component := SomeClass.GetType;
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
end.

UPDATE

TSomeClass<T: class, constructor>

has the same meaning as

TSomeClass<T: constructor>

because a record can have a constructor, but not a parameterless, so we have an implicit constraint to a class. And turning this around

TSomeClass<T: class>

could have an implicit constructor constraint

share|improve this answer
    
In fact you can end up with only partly or non initialized instances that way. Try creating a control that way for example. While you cannot call TControl.Create because it is hidden by the constructor that takes AOwner the compiler can when given to a generic type with constructor constraint! – Stefan Glienke Nov 14 '12 at 9:53

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