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I have an application that at a given intervall loops through a list of items (then length of this list varies) for each item it does a rather simple operation, it's not just adding a value but neither is it some really complex computations.

What I'm wondering is should i lock for each item like this (current solution):

def method_1:
    for item in the_list:
        do_operation(item);

def do_operation(item):
    lock()
    //do some stuff.
    unlock()

Or should I do it like this:

def method_1:
    lock()
    for item in the_list:
        do_operation(item);
    unlock()

def do_operation(item):
    //do some stuff.

I guess this is actually really hard to answer since i assume that much depends on what "do some stuff" is and how long it takes. And I honestly don't know how much time this takes. Especially compared to how long it takes for python to aquire the lock.

Let me know in the comments if I could improve my question somehow.

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1  
There tends to be a relatively high amount of overhead. Thus, I would tend to argue for the latter option. Especially in a case like this where there is no substantive part of the loop that wouldn't be part of the critical section. On the other hand, if do_operation is used elsewhere, and should always be protected, then it makes sense to perform the locking inside the function. –  jpm Nov 12 '12 at 12:57
    
If your not making use of threading then no, there is no need. There is noting in your code to suggest you need to use it. –  MattWritesCode Nov 12 '12 at 13:03
    
Many locks support the context manager protocol (with lock: do stuff). This is helpful in the case of an exception (alternative would be a try: / finally: clause). –  glglgl Nov 12 '12 at 13:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'd suggest locking for the entire list (option 2). If you only lock for each item the list could be modified partway through the operation, which could be problematic depending on what exactly you are doing. There are also overheads associated with each lock and unlock.

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Good point about the list getting changed. –  Daniel Figueroa Nov 12 '12 at 13:27
    
it depends if you are changing the list itself, mainly the length or order, or if you just change the elements therein. If you want to manipulate the list you should look into the Queue-module. More often then not you just want multiple threads to manipulate the members of a list/queue, because that's a basic producer/consumer paradigm in concurrency. –  Don Question Nov 12 '12 at 14:23

You generally want to keep the time-slice of locks as short as possible. so you would normaly lock just immediate before the variable access and drop it immediatly after again. You don't want to block a complete loop, as it deafeats the primary reason of concurrency.

In the case of lists: Did you look into the different Queue-classes especially meant for threaded execution?

And jpm's comment is right on the spot. if your other threads do some stuff too, you want them protected too. There may even be thread-starving issues.

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If the lock is just to protect the list (and not the items themselves) you could also do

def method_1:
    lock()
    list = the_list[:]
    unlock()
    for item in list:
        do_operation(item);
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