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I started learning C, and I dont understand what im doing wrong. Here is a simple code of a function that returns the pid+".data".

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

char * getfilename(){
    char name[60];
    sprintf(name,"%i.data",getpid());
    return name;
}

void main(){
    char* name = getfilename();
    printf("%s",name);
}

outputs: ��#�a. So I guess that im doing something wrong.

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1  
You should really compile with gcc -Wall -g to get all warnings and debugging info. GCC would have warned you. And then you may want to use gdb to debug the issue, once you have improved your code till no warnings are given. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 12 '12 at 13:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
char * getfilename(){
    char name[60];
    sprintf(name,"%i.data",getpid());
    return name;
}

You cannot access name object after getfilename has returned. The lifetime of the automatic object name ends at the getfilename last }. Accessing it after the function returns is undefined behavior.

As a temporary fix you can specify name as static and it will work. But what you should do is to have the getfilename function accepts a pointer argument where the filename will be written.

EDIT:

Why I don't suggest to use strdup?

  • strdup is not a Standard C function. strdup lives in the POSIX world. For portability reasons whenever I can, I prefer to use Standard C functions.
  • strdup performs a hidden malloc call and you have not to forget to perform a free. This is contrary to all functions of the Standard C library which never call malloc (or actually that never appear to call malloc). strdup is a bad API design.
  • strdup is performing a copy of a string. Why do you need to perform an extra copy? Just write the string in a place you can retrieve it.
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One solution is to use strdup, i.e. change:

return name;

to:

return strdup(name);

This makes a copy of your temporary (local) string using dynamic memory allocation (i.e. malloc).

You must of course make sure that you subsequently free this string when you're done with it.

You'll need:

#include <string.h> // strdup()
#include <stdlib.h> // free()
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I'll +1 if you include the relevant header file. –  jpm Nov 12 '12 at 13:12
    
@jpm: OK - done. –  Paul R Nov 12 '12 at 13:15
char name[60] 

lives on the stack, but only as long as being inside getfilename() afterwards its freed, so any references (as also returned by getfilename()) to it become invalid.

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char name[60] is a local variable which is allocated when the function is called and deallocated when it returns. When you try to return it, you're really returning it's address (after all arrays are mostly syntactic sugar for pointer arithmetic). Now, your caller has a pointer to a block of memory that has been free, and thus will likely contain garbage.

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You can't return the array name from your function getfilename, because it is a (regular) local variable and those get cleaned up when the function returnes. So, when you get back in main and try to print the returned value, the pointer name there refers to a block of memory that has been reused for other purposes.

There are several solutions for this problem:

  1. Make name in getfilename static. This will ensure that it outlives the call to getfilename and can safely be returned, but has the drawback that all calls to getfilename use the same buffer.
  2. Allocate the array dynamically with malloc (and don't forget to clean it up with free when you are done with it)
  3. Pass the buffer to store the value in as a parameter.
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One of the best answers. One question, what would be the problem with using the same buffer on the calls of getfilename? –  Alejandro Garcia Nov 12 '12 at 13:24
    
In this particular case there are no problems. But imagine this code char* one = getfilename(); char*two=getfilename(); where getfilename can fill the buffer with different contents on each call. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Nov 12 '12 at 14:01

As mentioned in the other answers you cannot return a pointer which points somewhere in the stack of a function.

You can simply pass the allocated array to getfilename() function. You can rewrite the program as follows.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

void getfilename(char * name)
{

    sprintf(name,"%i.data",getpid());
}

int main(void)
{
    char name[60];
    getfilename(name);
    printf("%s\n",name);
    return 0;
}

This should work fine.

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