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I have a function that looks like the function below. It takes an object called link, calls getAdminParams and then uses the return values of that call to change properties in the link object:

function checkParams(link: Link) {
    var rtn : IAdminParams = null,
        table = null;
    if (link.Action === "Create") {
        if (link.Params == null) {
            rtn = getAdminParams(link.Entity);
            if (rtn.Success) {
                link.Url = link.Href + rtn.Param;
                table = rtn.Table;
            } else {
                link.$Link.prop('disabled', false);
                return;
            }
        } else {
            link.Url = link.Href + link.Params;
            table = link.Entity;
        }
    } else {
        link.Url = link.Href;
    }
}

I am calling the function as below.

function adminDialog($link: JQuery) {
    var link = new Link($link);
    checkParams(link);
    doDialogAjax(link);
}

When I pass the value of link to the checkParams(link) will it be passed by reference? In other words will the changes I make in the checkParams(link: Link) function be available to the link object so they can be used in the doDialogAjax function?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, and no.

"When I pass the value of link to the checkParams(link) will it be passed by reference?"

No.

"Will the changes I make in the checkParams(link: Link) function be available to the link object so they can be used in the doDialogAjax function?"

Yes.

The variable is not passed by reference. It's passed by value, but the value is a reference.

If the variable was passed by reference, the function could change the variable. That doesn't happen:

function change(obj) {
  // change the object
  obj.value = 42;
  // replace it with a new object
  obj = { value: 1 };
}

// create an object
var a = { value: 0 };

// create another variable, to use in the call to the function
var b = a;

change(b);

alert(a.value); // shows 42, as the function changes the object passed in
alert(b.value); // shows 42, not 1, as the variable b is not changed by the function

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/sCJHu/

If the variable was passed by reference, b would be replaced by the new object create in the function, and b.value would be 1.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the line "The variable is not passed by reference. It's passed by value, but the value is a reference.", the rest is just gravy. :-) – T.J. Crowder Nov 12 '12 at 13:34

Yes, the changes you make in the function receiving the object are visible in other uses of the objects.

Simple test :

​function increment(obj) {
    obj.a++;    
}
var myobj = {a:3};
increment(myobj);
document.write(myobj.a); // prints 4

Demonstration

Answering a comment : arrays are objects and it works the same.

You might see, in this precise case, the passing mode as a "pass by reference" but that's just using some vocabulary of another language : you pass the value of the variable and variable values for objects are their references. The problem with this vocabulary is exemplified by Archer's mistake : you can't replace the variable's value :

​function increment(obj) {
    obj = {a:4}; // doesn't change the passed object, just the local variable obj
}
var myobj = {a:3};
increment(myobj);
document.write(myobj.a); // prints 3 because myobj isn't changed

To say it otherwise : a function can modify an object that is the value of an external variable passed to it, it can't replace it. Because you don't pass a reference to original variable as you would do in C.

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1  
so sweet little nice demo! +10 – Roko C. Buljan Nov 12 '12 at 13:19
    
"You can see it as a "pass by reference"." Please don't perpetuate that myth. It's not pass by reference. It's pass by value. The value being passed is an object reference, but just because the word "reference" appears in both terms, it doesn't mean they're the same. – T.J. Crowder Nov 12 '12 at 13:22
    
Doesn't work with arrays - incomplete answer. Example fiddle – Archer Nov 12 '12 at 13:25
    
Of course it works for array too : jsfiddle.net/dystroy/crGmH – Denys Séguret Nov 12 '12 at 13:26
1  
@dystroy Thanks for the clarification. I did think it was just arrays, but it's clearly not. Perhaps this needs a better explanation as it's clearly not a case of passing variables by reference, or your 2nd example would work. – Archer Nov 12 '12 at 13:35

When I pass an object to a javascript function does that object get passed by reference?

A reference to the object is passed to the function (this is not "pass by reference", that's a different thing entirely). A simpler example helps make this clear:

function foo(o1) {
    console.log("foo1: o1.a = " + o1.a);
    o1.a = "updated";    // <=== MODIFYING the object
    console.log("foo2: o1.a = " + o1.a);
}
function bar(o2) {
    console.log("bar1: o2.a = " + o2.a);
    o2 = {a: "updated"}; // <=== Pointing to a DIFFERENT object (no effect outside function)
    console.log("bar2: o2.a = " + o2.a);
}

var x = {a: "original x"};
foo(x);           // Logs "foo1: o1.a = original x",
                  // then "foo2: o1.a = updated"
console.log(x.a); // Logs "updated"

var y = {a: "original y"};
bar(y);           // Logs "bar1: o2.a = original y",
                  // then "bar2: o2.a = updated"
console.log(y.a); // Logs "original y", *NOT* "updated"

Note that this is pass by value; the value in question with objects is an object reference. You may see people calling it "pass by reference," but that's fundamentally wrong. If a variable is "pass by reference," that means you can change the variable's value in the calling code. E.g., it would mean our functions could change what x and y refer to. But they can't, as we can see from bar above. They can only change properties on the objects that x and y refer to, not x and y themselves.

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Doesn't work with arrays - incomplete answer. Example fiddle – Archer Nov 12 '12 at 13:26
    
Nope - change to alerts and it's still exactly the same. Check my example to see. – Archer Nov 12 '12 at 13:30
    
Lurkers: See comments under dystroy's answer, @Archer was just misreading. (I can see why with dystroy's answer, I don't see how I was unclear on the point.) – T.J. Crowder Nov 12 '12 at 13:50
    
You weren't - that was my bad, and I apologise. I didn't mark either answer down though. Yours is definitely clearer (or was until dystroy's was modified). – Archer Nov 12 '12 at 14:10
    
@Archer: Interesting (and thanks), I wonder who did -- and why. – T.J. Crowder Nov 12 '12 at 14:11

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