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Suppose I've got code like

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    cout << "Redirect to file1" << endl;
    cout << "Redirect to file2" << endl;
    return 0;
}

I want to redirect the first output to file1 and the second to file2. Is that possible?

I think in C, fclose(stdout) and reopen the stdout might help but I'm not sure how to reopen it or whether it works.

Thanks

UPDATE: What for?

I have a program A, which reads input from the user and generates corresponding output. Now I want to check whether it is correct, I have a program B which generate input for A, as well as correct output. B will generate one set of test data at a time. And I will have thousands of tests.

On my machine, a thousand times ./B > ``mktemp a.XXX`` works better than using ofstream. Using fstream for thousands of times, my hard drive light flashes crazily. But not when redirecting to temp file.

UPDATE2:

In C++, it seems that the prevailing answer is cout along with cerr.

What about C, apart from stderr, can I close stdout and reopen it?

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1  
In a POSIX (Linux/OSX/BSD) shell you can redirect stdout and stderr differently. That's the only way you could do it, by using std::cout and std::cerr. In a Windows console I don't think it's possible. Also, you can't mix the old C stdio function with C++ streams. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 12 '12 at 13:23
    
@Pileborg thanks. is there a way to reopen stdout if I fclose(stdout)? Say in Linux, can I use fopen(...) to reopen stdout? And what parameters for it? Thanks –  gongzhitaao Nov 12 '12 at 13:57
    
It's possible, but involves knowing what TTY device it was connected to first, and you probably have to use the open system call and then use fdopen. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 12 '12 at 14:12
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can always use the standard error stream for e.g. error messages.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    cout << "Redirect to file1" << endl;
    cerr << "Redirect to file2" << endl;
}

For example, using the Windows [cmd.exe] command interpreter, and the Visual C++ cl compiler:

[D:\dev\test]
> type con >streams.cpp
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    cout << "Redirect to file1" << endl;
    cerr << "Redirect to file2" << endl;
}
^Z

[D:\dev\test]
> cl streams.cpp
streams.cpp

[D:\dev\test]
> streams 1>a.txt 2>b.txt

[D:\dev\test]
> type a.txt
Redirect to file1

[D:\dev\test]
> type b.txt
Redirect to file2

[D:\dev\test]
> _


EDIT: added colorized code and boldface emphasis.

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks, I could just accept one answer =) Please see my update2. –  gongzhitaao Nov 12 '12 at 13:52
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You can use cout AND cerr.

cout << "Redirect to file1" << endl;
cerr << "Redirect to file2" << endl;

cerr goes to standard error

share|improve this answer
    
many thanks. Please see my update2. –  gongzhitaao Nov 12 '12 at 13:50
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Why not use file streams ? this way it will most likely work regardless of the shell redirection:

#include <fstream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;
// opeen files
ofstream file1 ( "file1");
ofstream file2 ( "file2");
//write
file1 << "Redirect to file1" << endl;
file2 << "Redirect to file2" << endl;
//close files
file1.close();
file2.close();
share|improve this answer
    
Quite complicated to explain. I will update my question to give a backgroud. –  gongzhitaao Nov 12 '12 at 13:29
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Another way doing it is using cout.rdbuf() like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main () {
    ofstream cfile1("test1.txt");
    ofstream cfile2("test2.txt");

    cout.rdbuf(cfile1.rdbuf());        
    cout << "Redirect to file1" << endl;

    cout.rdbuf(cfile2.rdbuf());        
    cout << "Redirect to file2" << endl; 

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
No ofstream. Thousands of ofstream in a sequence seems to put a heavy load on my hard drive. –  gongzhitaao Nov 12 '12 at 13:44
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Code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    cout << "Redirect to file1" << endl;
    cerr << "Redirect to file2" << endl;
    return 0;
}

Console:

test > 1.txt 2> 2.txt

1.txt:

Redirect to file1

2.txt:

Redirect to file2
share|improve this answer
    
many thanks, I could only accept one answer=P. Please see my update2 of my question. –  gongzhitaao Nov 12 '12 at 13:51
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