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I did this little test program in python to see how solve and nsolve work.

from sympy import *

theta = Symbol('theta')
phi = Symbol('phi')

def F(theta,phi):
    return sin(theta)*cos(phi)+cos(phi)**2
def G(phi):
    return ((1 + sqrt(3))*sin(phi) - 4*pi*sin(2*phi)*cos(2*phi))
solution1 = solve(F(pi/2,phi),phi)
solution2 = solve(G(phi),phi)
solution3 = nsolve(G(phi),0)
solution4 = nsolve(G(phi),1)
solution5 = nsolve(G(phi),2)
solution6 = nsolve(G(phi),3)
print solution1, solution2, solution3, solution4, solution5, solution6

And I get this output:

[pi/2, pi] [] 0.0 -0.713274788952698 2.27148961717279 3.14159265358979

The first call of solve gave me two solutions of the corresponding function. But not the second one. I wonder why? nsolve seems to work with an initial test value, but depending on that value, it gives different numerical solutions. Is there a way to get the list all numerical solutions with nsolve or with another function, in just one line?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first call of solve gave me two solutions of the corresponding function. But not the second one. I wonder why?

In general, you cannot solve an equation symbolically and apparently solve does exactly that. In other words: Consider yourself lucky if solve can solve your equation, the typical technical applications don't have analytic solutions, that is, cannot be solved symbolically.

So the fall-back option is to solve the equation numerically, which starts from an initial point. In the general case, there is no guarantee that nsolve will find a solution even if exists one.

Is there a way to get the list all numerical solutions with nsolve or with another function, in just one line?

In general, no. Nevertheless, you can start nsolve from a number of initial guesses and keep track of the solutions found. You might want to distribute your initial guesses uniformly in the interval of interest. This is called multi-start method.

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Thanks! I put nsolve inside a for loop to keep track of the solutions found with different initial guesses, uniformly distributed in [0,pi]. –  aymenbh Nov 12 '12 at 16:50
    
@user1816760 Yes, that could work. The multistart method is often the right method to apply. Keep in mind that it is very likely that the same solution will be found multiple times AND the solutions are only approximate. For example, let's assume that the exact solution is 0.5, then you will find 0.4999997 and 0.5000002 and so on. Even though they differ, only one of them should be stored. I hope you see what I mean. –  Ali Nov 12 '12 at 17:21
    
Yes, I see. I tried with other functions, and I get sometimes the exact same solution multiple times or some values which are near to each other as you mentioned. I will take this into account for storing the data. –  aymenbh Nov 12 '12 at 18:27
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And even if analytic solutions exist, there's no reason to believe that SymPy's solver algorithms will find them. They're not infallible. –  asmeurer Nov 13 '12 at 6:26
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