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I wanted to have a Simple PreLoaded Html Mobile Quiz that shows one question on a screen at a time via jquery using showing/hidding divs

The problem comes when the user needs to skip over a question or two, I wanted to do this by setting flags if I should show that div or not based on the users select/option value/answer

I have found solutions on here, but what I really need is a simple way with flags to know if the next div should be showed or not q2skipped=true or q2skipped=false

if it's not shown, then it would go to test q3skipped flag

I made a example in jsfiddle here:

<div class="question" id="question1">Q.1 Do you like Milk 
    <select name="1" onchange="displayElements(this.value);" >
        <option value="yes">Yes</option>
        <option value="no">No</option>
        <option >Goto Next Question</option>
        <option value="q2skipped=true">Skip Next Question</option>
        <option value="q2skipped=true;q3skipped=true">Skip Next 2 Questions</option>
    </select><br>
    <div> 
        <input type="submit" id="button" value="Submit" onclick='doSubmit(this)'>
    </div>
</div>
share|improve this question
    
Are you hardcoding your option values? Or are they dynamically constructed on page load? – Flater Nov 12 '12 at 13:46
    
Option Values would be HardCoded always – Heather McVay Nov 12 '12 at 13:51
    
You should consider trying a more repeatable approach. I'll put together an answer with some tips to help you with this, give me a few minutes :) – Flater Nov 12 '12 at 14:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems a more repeatable approach is warranted. Hardcoding all values for all questions is an annoying task, and you'll have to repeat that if you ever have to create a new quiz.

I don't understand the full scope of your application, but I'll give you some general tips to help you get on the path to a cleaner solution.

(1) Style your questions by using classes. For example, you could use the following CSS:

 .answered { background-color: green;  }
 .skipped  { background-color: yellow; }

CSS will be irrelevant if you hide the questions after being answered, but it does help demonstrate my point.

(2) Refrain from using hardcoded values in the HTML (except of course the question number) Something like:

<div class="question" id="question1">Q.1 Do you like Milk 
    <select class="answer">
        <option value="yes">Yes</option>
        <option value="no">No</option>
        <option value="skip">Goto Next Question</option>
        <option value="skip_one">Skip Next Question</option>
        <option value="skip_two">Skip Next 2 Questions</option>
    </select><br>
    <div> 
        <input type="submit" value="Submit" onclick='doSubmit(1)'>
    </div>
</div>

I see you using id="button" on the submit button. This is a fairly bad idea since an ID should be unique. The best way is to not mention an ID on the button if you don't need it.

Also note that the button's onclick event now passes the ID of the question. It'll become clear later on.

I added an "answer" class to the select so you can easily retrieve the user's answer later on.

I also left out the onclick and name attributes with the select button. I'm not sure what the onclick event should do (unrelated to this question?) And the name attribute doesn't really seem necessary here (again, if it's needed by something that isn't mentioned in this question, you can add it again).

(3) Use javascript/jQuery to define what should happen.

$(document).ready(function() {
    //These things should occur on page load:

    $(".question").hide(); //Hides all questions
    $("#question1").show(); //Bring back the first question.
});

//The rest will be done in the doSubmit() function:

function doSubmit (questionID) {
    //get the value from the <select> in the div
    var question = $("#question"+questionID);
    var answer = question.find(".answer").val();

    var nextquestionID = 0; //will be set in the switch case.

    switch(answer) {

        case "yes":
            question.addClass("answered");
            nextquestionID = questionID + 1;
            break;

        case "no":
            question.addClass("answered");
            nextquestionID = questionID + 1;
            break;

        case "skip":
            question.addClass("skipped");
            nextquestionID = questionID + 1;
            break;

        case "skip_one":
            question.addClass("skipped");
            var skippedquestionID = questionID + 1; //the next one will be marked as skipped
            $("#question" + skippedquestionID ).addClass("skipped");

            nextquestionID = questionID + 2;

            break;

        case "skip_two":
            question.addClass("skipped");
            var skippedquestionID = questionID + 1; //the next one will be marked as skipped
            $("#question" + skippedquestionID ).addClass("skipped");
            var skippedquestionID_2 = questionID + 2; //also the next one will be marked as skipped
            $("#question" + skippedquestionID_2 ).addClass("skipped");

            nextquestionID = questionID + 3;
            break;

    }

    //Whatever was selected, now the original question must be hidden, and the new question (ID is contained in nextquestionID ) should be shown:
    question.hide();
    $("#question" + nextquestionID).show();
}

This should get you further in building a repeatable process for handling the user's answers. I hope I was able to make it clear enough so you understand; if not, feel free to ask :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Note: I did not include any code that marks a previously skipped question as answered, because there is no code to actually go back to that element in your example. But if my explanation was clear enough, you should be able to easily add it when creating a way to navigate back to the skipped questions. – Flater Nov 12 '12 at 15:18

You could just use the jquery .addClass(), .removeClass() and .hasClass() functions to decorate the divs as needed.

i.e.

  $('#q1').addClass('skipped')    //when they skip a question
  $('#q1').removeClass('skipped') //when they finally answer it

  if ($('#q1').hasClass('skipped')===true) //test if a question was skipped.
  {

  }  .... etc
share|improve this answer
    
looks interesting, is there a basic example of this somewhere? (jsfiddle?) – Heather McVay Nov 12 '12 at 14:29

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