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I have read a image file into a array like this

A = imread(fileName);

and now i want to calculate shannon entropy. The shannon entropy implementation found in maltab is a byte level entropy analysis which considers a file to be composed of 256 byte levels.

wentropy(x,'shannon')

But i need to perform a bigram entropy analysis which would need to view a file as consisting of 65536 levels. Could anyone suggest me a good method of accomplishing this.

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I am interested. Can you define the math a little better? –  Acorbe Nov 12 '12 at 15:36
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1 Answer 1

The entropy of a random variable can be calculated using the following formula: enter image description here

Where p(x) is the Prob(X=x).

Given a set of n observations (x1, x2, .... xn) You then compute P(X=x) for the range all x values (in your case it would be between (0 and 65535) and then sum across all values. The easiest way to do this is using hist

byteLevel = 65536
% count the observations

observationHist = hist(observations, byteLevel);
% convert to a probability
probXVal = observationHist ./ sum(observationHist);  

% compute the entropy
entropy = - sum( probXVal .* log2(probXVal) );

There are several implementations of this on the file exchange that are worth checking out.

Note: where are you getting that wentropy is using 256 byte levels? I don't see that anywhere in the docks? Remember that in Matlab the pixels of a color image have 3 channels (R,G,B) with each channel requiring 8 bits (or 256 byte levels?).

Also because each channel is bound between [0 256) you could create a mapping from P(R=r,G=g,B=b) to P(X=x) as follows:

data = imageData(:,:,1);
data = data + (imgData(:,:,2) * 256);
data = data + (imgData(:,:,3) * 256 * 256);

I believe you can then use data to calculate the total entropy of the image where each channel is independent.

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Nice! thus you are calculating sort of redundancy of the image from the chromatic point of view, right? The point is why 65536? @Crowso, are you working with one "joint" color channel 16bit wide? –  Acorbe Nov 12 '12 at 16:34
    
@Acorbe, yes entropy is a measure of the uncertainty or information contained in a random variable. If a random variable produces results with a high level of uncertainty it has a lot of entropy. Likewise if the uncertainty is low so is the entropy. –  slayton Nov 12 '12 at 16:40
    
Now you have 16M bit, though. May the user have a 6bit/color image? –  Acorbe Nov 12 '12 at 18:34
    
@Acorbe yes, that is correct that X can take on values between [0, 2^24). Its not entirely clear what the OP actually wants to do –  slayton Nov 12 '12 at 18:37
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