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i've got an application with a possible number of threads. basicly the threads should work this:

  • Main Thread
  • CalculationThread
  • CalculationThread
  • CalculationThread

Adding / Executing those threads to a FixedThreadPool isn't the problem. The Thread itself calls a certain function in the Mainthread to submit the results. After this step, the thread should sleep until it will be called again for the next calucation.

The Mainthread holds a reference to a CalculationThread to submit updates to the thread and readd it to the pool to start the next calculation.

My Problem: How can I enforce a timeout for a certain thread? The enforcement of this timeout must also work, if a endless loop occurs

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1 Answer 1

You cannot enforce the timeout without cooperation from the thread, at least not in a sane way. You should code your calculation tasks so that they comply with the Java interruption mechanism. Basically, that means occasionally checking the Thread.interrupted return value and aborting on true.

The only other option is the ham-handed – and deprecated – Thread.stop, which can wreak general chaos, especially when done on a pool-managed thread.

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The Problem is that the thread calls/wraps an external libary. So is there a method to throw the thread away with a minimal collateral damage? –  jwacalex Nov 12 '12 at 13:58
    
Unfortunately there isn't. This is a quite frequently asked question here, and I have never read any better suggestions. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 12 '12 at 14:02
    
Why not using Guava‌​'s ListenableFutures with a FutureCallback so you can do something if it works or it fails? –  ElderMael Nov 12 '12 at 14:19
    
@mael OP is interested in neither success nor failure events. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 12 '12 at 14:30
    
@MarkoTopolnik if i'll use Thread.stop the allocated system ressources will be wasted, because the jvm won't free it again. –  jwacalex Nov 12 '12 at 16:34

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