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I have the following class defined:

class Link {
    Action: string;
    DialogType: string;
    constructor ($link: JQuery) {
        this.Action = $link.attr('data-action') || '';
        this.DialogType = $link.attr('data-dialogType') || '';
    }
}

I have function that declares an instance of the class. Once the class is declared then I can use intellisense and there is full type checking:

function adminDialog($link: JQuery) {
    var link = new Link($link);
    link.Modal.MaxHeight = 600;
    doDialogAjax(link);
}

In the doDialogAjax function below I still have full type checking:

function doDialogAjax(link: Link) {
    $.ajax( link.Url, {
        cache: false,
        context: { link: link },
        dataType: 'html'
    }).done(onDialogDone).fail(onDialogFail);
}

At this point I lose the type checking if I try to access this.link:

function onDialogDone(data: any, textStatus: string, jqXHR: JQueryXHR) {

    // no type checking. I can type anything after this.link
    var x = this.link.abcdefg;

    // I assign to link
    var link: Link = this.link;

    // Now I get checking
    var a = link.Modal.MaxHeight; // allowed
    var a = link.abcdefg;         // error

    // However will the following change the property of the link passed 
    // into the function. I assume not but I am not 100% sure.
    link.Modal.MaxHeight = 999;

}

So my question here is how can I get type checking for the value of link passed using context to the function onDialogDone? Also am I correct in saying that after I create a new variable link in that function then any changes made to link will not be made to the object that is passed in as this.link?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This line is a perfectly valid way of doing what you want:

var link: Link = this.link;

I would suggest changing it to:

var link = <Link>this.link;

Each object in JavaScript is a reference, and you don't create a new object with this line. So any change on the new link variable is reflected on this.link.

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The value of link should still be typed if you make your success (and, for that matter, fail) functions anonymous, using the ()=> lambda syntax:

function doDialogAjax(link: Link) {
    $.ajax( link.Url, {
        cache: false,
        context: { link: link },
        dataType: 'html'
    }).done((data: any, textStatus: string, jqXHR: JQueryXHR) => {
        var x = link.Modal.MaxHeight; // You should get type checking here without needing to do anything else, whether or not link is a property of the root 'this'.
   }).fail((/*args*/)=> { /*Fail function*/ });
}
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I'm a bit confused here because in my example I call onDialogDone and this is in a different file to doDialogAjax. The only connection between the two is through the context. –  Samantha J Nov 12 '12 at 15:48
    
Sorry, I didn't see that they were in separate files in your question. If you have the function in a separate file then the only way to access it is if they share the same context - so var link: Link = this.link; (as you already have), is correct, and can be improved as @Boris Yankov describes below. It's unusual (to me) to have the event handlers for an ajax function in a separate file from the ajax call, and the advantage of ()=> anonymous or lambda syntax is that it does make it easier to maintain the correct context. –  JcFx Nov 12 '12 at 15:57

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