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I am having an issue with an autorelease pool crash on shutdown which I've reduced to the small test case below that simply creates a window and then closes it. The crash disappears if the -fobjc-arc flag is taken away. Running on OS X 10.8.2, Clang 4.1 (421.11.66). I am hoping that someone with a more in depth understanding of ARC can enlighten me as to what is going on here - running with zombie objects on shows that it is the NSWindow object that is getting released too many times, or not retained enough, but I thought ARC was meant to take care of all this?

The stack trace is:

0   libobjc.A.dylib                 0x00007fff8fad4f5e objc_release + 14
1   libobjc.A.dylib                 0x00007fff8fad4230 (anonymous namespace)::AutoreleasePoolPage::pop(void*) + 464
2   com.apple.CoreFoundation        0x00007fff99d22342 _CFAutoreleasePoolPop + 34
3   com.apple.Foundation            0x00007fff936e84fa -[NSAutoreleasePool drain] + 154
4   com.apple.Foundation            0x00007fff936effa0 _NSAppleEventManagerGenericHandler + 125
5   com.apple.AE                    0x00007fff93a5ab48 aeDispatchAppleEvent(AEDesc const*, AEDesc*, unsigned int, unsigned char*) + 307
6   com.apple.AE                    0x00007fff93a5a9a9 dispatchEventAndSendReply(AEDesc const*, AEDesc*) + 37
7   com.apple.AE                    0x00007fff93a5a869 aeProcessAppleEvent + 318
8   com.apple.HIToolbox             0x00007fff8d0c18e9 AEProcessAppleEvent + 100
9   com.apple.AppKit                0x00007fff8e95c916 _DPSNextEvent + 1456
10  com.apple.AppKit                0x00007fff8e95bed2 -[NSApplication nextEventMatchingMask:untilDate:inMode:dequeue:] + 128
11  com.apple.AppKit                0x00007fff8e953283 -[NSApplication run] + 517
12  Test                            0x00000001070e1d68 main + 152 (Test.mm:31)
13  libdyld.dylib                   0x00007fff8e10c7e1 start + 1

And the code for the test case is:

// Tested with `clang++ -fobjc-arc -g Test.mm -framework Cocoa -o Test && ./Test`

#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>

@interface MyApplication : NSApplication
@end
@implementation MyApplication
- (void) applicationDidFinishLaunching: (NSNotification *) note
{
    NSWindow * window = [[NSWindow alloc] initWithContentRect: NSMakeRect(100, 100, 100, 100)
                        styleMask: NSTitledWindowMask backing: NSBackingStoreBuffered defer: YES];

    [window close];

    [super stop: self];
}
@end

int main()
{
    @autoreleasepool
    {
        const ProcessSerialNumber psn = { 0, kCurrentProcess };
        TransformProcessType(&psn, kProcessTransformToForegroundApplication);
        SetFrontProcess(&psn);

        [MyApplication sharedApplication];
        [NSApp setDelegate: NSApp];

        [NSApp run];
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Using Instruments' Zombies profile showed that the NSWindow object gets put into the autorelease pool by the call to close:. ARC then correctly ends up with a reference count of zero once applicationDidFinishLaunching: completes and destroys the NSWindow instance. However, the autorelease pool still knows about the now-defunct NSWindow instance and then tries to release it on shutdown, causing the crash.

Autoreleasing objects being managed under ARC seems like a bad idea unless the autorelease pool holds zeroing weak references to its objects, which it doesn't seem to be doing here.

The problem can be prevented by telling the window not to autorelease on close by adding [window setReleasedWhenClosed: NO];.

share|improve this answer

ARC will only retain a newly created object if you assign it to a variable that has an extent greater than the current scope. Otherwise, the object would be leaked.

In your example, you're creating a new instance of NSWindow by calling alloc, which temporarily transfers ownership to the local variable, window. Since that variable ceases to exist at the end of method, ARC has to insert a release call to avoid leaking the window instance. As a result, the instance is no longer owned by anything, and therefore deallocates itself.

To fix this, declare a property of type NSWindow with strong semantics, and pass the window instance to the property setter method (or directly assign it to the corresponding instance variable -- either will work).

EDIT

To be clear, what you need to do is add a declared property (or at least an instance variable) to MyApplication, for example

@interface MyApplication : NSApplication

@property (strong, nonatomic) NSWindow *window;

@end

Then, in your implementation of applicationDidFinishLaunching, set the property:

@implementation MyApplication

- (void) applicationDidFinishLaunching: (NSNotification *) note
{
    NSWindow *window = [[NSWindow alloc] initWithContentRect:NSMakeRect(100, 100, 100, 100)
                        styleMask:NSTitledWindowMask backing:NSBackingStoreBuffered defer:YES];

    self.window = window;

    ...
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, if I was using the window beyond the scope of applicationDidFinishLaunching the instance would need a strong reference at a broader scope, but this example just tries to make a window and then close it. The NSWindow object isn't used anywhere else outside this one method in this test case. Also, adding __strong to the definition of window doesn't make any difference, presumably because this is already there by default. Does that make sense? – Richard Viney Nov 14 '12 at 20:47
    
If the window instance doesn't exist beyond the scope of applicationDidFinishLaunching you'd never be able to use it, because it would be deallocated immediately. In order to use the window, you have to ensure that it's owned by something in your app. The local variable window only exists until the end of the method's scope. ARC then sends a release message to the window instance. Since at that point the window has no owners, it deallocates itself. You need to store the window in an instance variable in order to keep it from deallocating itself. – jlehr Nov 26 '12 at 22:20
2  
By the way, the reason your code works with ARC disabled is because without ARC the window is leaked at the end of applicationDidFinishLaunching. At that point, the only reference you have to the window instance is in the local variable window, which ceases to exist at the end of the method. Since your code no longer knows the address of the window, it can never be sent a release message, and therefore can never be deallocated. – jlehr Nov 26 '12 at 22:25
    
Yes this example was fairly contrived, just meant to illustrate the crash, and not be an example of real-world window management! And also with ARC disabled the window doesn't technically leak, [window close] puts it into the autorelease pool so it is then deallocated in main() when the autorelease pool ends. Thanks. – Richard Viney Nov 28 '12 at 3:13

With ARC you need to use properties for things that are suppose to stay afloat for longer.

To abstract private properties, use anonymous category in your .m file.

There's more info in http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#releasenotes/ObjectiveC/RN-TransitioningToARC/Introduction/Introduction.html

This fixes it:

@interface MyApplication : NSApplication
@property NSWindow *window;

@end

@implementation MyApplication
- (void) applicationDidFinishLaunching: (NSNotification *) note
{
  self.window = [[NSWindow alloc] initWithContentRect: NSMakeRect(100, 100, 100, 100)
                                                  styleMask: NSTitledWindowMask backing: NSBackingStoreBuffered defer: YES];

  [self.window close];

  [super stop: self];
}
@end

int main()
{
  @autoreleasepool
  {
    const ProcessSerialNumber psn = { 0, kCurrentProcess };
    TransformProcessType(&psn, kProcessTransformToForegroundApplication);
    SetFrontProcess(&psn);

    [MyApplication sharedApplication];
    [NSApp setDelegate: NSApp];

    [NSApp run];
  }

  return 0;
}

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
This is good general advice for ARC applications but from what I can tell wasn't the cause of the crash in this example. I think I figured it out in the end, see my answer just posted for details on what was going on. Thanks. – Richard Viney Nov 20 '12 at 10:02
    
well, give us at least +1 Richard then. – GregJaskiewicz Nov 21 '12 at 11:15
    
Also, per your own comment - using property actually fixes that too. And is recommended, so I'm still thinking that my answer is less hacky. – GregJaskiewicz Nov 21 '12 at 11:16
    
I don't follow, the whole point is that the NSWindow instance here is in local scope, are you saying we need to store locally scoped instances in properties when using ARC? When the method finishes the NSWindow instance is correctly deallocated, it isn't meant to 'stay afloat for longer'. The problem is that [window close] does an autorelease, if you remove that line the crash goes away. This seems really to be an undesirable interaction between ARC code and non-ARC code that calls autorelease. – Richard Viney Nov 22 '12 at 4:27
    
I cannot say I'm an expert on these matters. But for the past year or so, I did read and noticed through my own experience that often times you do need to store things that you previously wouldn't have to as properties with ARC indeed. – GregJaskiewicz Nov 22 '12 at 21:27

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