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This is a self answered question.

Found a program that seems to go into an infinite loop though there is no loop in the program. So thought i would share the program as well as my observations.

Following program goes into an infinite loop. And continuously prints 20 on VS 2008 windows XP. Explain the behavior.

#include <stdio.h> 

int *p;
int val;
void calla (int a)
{
   p = &a;
   val = *(--p);
   printf("%d\n", a);
}
void callb (int b)
{
   p = &b;
   *(--p) = val;
   printf("%d\n", b);
}

int main ()
{
   int a = 10;
   int b = 20;
   calla(a);
   callb(b);
   return 0;
}
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closed as not a real question by Kiril Kirov, mux, Daniel Fischer, Daniel Gehriger, djechlin Nov 12 '12 at 17:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
May i know why it has been downvoted and voted for close ? –  CCoder Nov 12 '12 at 14:59
2  
I voted to close because "You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face". A specially crafted programme to exploit the implementation details of one particular compiler to create an infinite loop using undefined behaviour isn't an "actual problem that you face". –  Daniel Fischer Nov 12 '12 at 15:05
1  
@DanielFischer I agree that it is an undefined behavior. I was asked this question in an interview and the interviewer expected me to know what exactly is happening in this code. I figured out what was happening and wanted to share the same with everyone. I read on meta that it is perfectly fine to answer your question yourself. In the question itself I clearly mentioned that I found this program and I have few observations to share about this program. –  CCoder Nov 12 '12 at 15:10
2  
Terrible interviewer, terrible interview question. Not sure whether it being an interview question changes my opinion on whether this question should be closed. Anyway, I have voted to close, and that vote cannot be rescinded. Regarding "answering your own question", yes, that's perfectly fine. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 12 '12 at 15:19
    
@DanielFischer Yes. He told me, I can make any assumptions as far as I state them with the answer. –  CCoder Nov 12 '12 at 15:20
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all this is bad coding ! The behavior is compiler and platform specific.

All what is being done in this program is replacing the return address of function callb() by the starting address of callb(). Lets see how.

Answer assumes 4 byte integers and pointers. Also specific to only msvc and x86 platform. Should not be generalized.

void calla (int a)
{
   /* Get the stack top address into p. */
   p = &a;

   /* Store the address beneath variable a in variable val. 
    * Now val should contain the return address of function calla() 
    * i.e. address of first instruction in function callb() */
   val = *(--p);
   /* Simply print a*/
   printf("%d\n", a);
}
void callb (int b)
{
   /* Get the stack top address into p. */
   p = &b;

   /* Replace the return value of callb() (return 
    * value of callb() is stored on stack right beneath the argument b) by val 
    * which is nothing but the address of first instruction in function callb()*/

   *(--p) = val;

   printf("%d\n", b);
}

So after executing the function callb() program jumps to the address stored on the stack which is nothing but the address of first instruction in callb(). Hence it looks like an infinite loop !

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Why the downvote? –  CCoder Nov 12 '12 at 14:55
    
I didn't downvote you (but voted to close the question). But to me, the question and the answer are pointless. It assumes a very specific platform for the bug "to work", and even if the behavior can be explained under those circumstances, it's just a bug. That being said, you certainly found the correct explanation. –  Daniel Gehriger Nov 12 '12 at 16:05
    
@DanielGehriger As I already mentioned in the comments given for the questions, it was asked to me in an interview and I just wanted to share the same with everyone. For a newbie it might not be very obvious answer and it also helps understanding the concept of how function calls work. –  CCoder Nov 12 '12 at 16:13
1  
That's where I disagree. I really believe the question (which isn't yours) is terrible. I also think your answer to it is correct. That's why I up voted your answer but also voted to close the question, because I don't see any value in it. If, however, you presented it as a question about calling conventions, where the return address is stored, etc etc, and finally ask, given that information, how this explains the infinite loop in that code, then I could see its value. But that's just my view - don't take it personally (and hey, I do like your answer!) –  Daniel Gehriger Nov 12 '12 at 16:18
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