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Is there a difference between the following definitions?

const     double PI = 3.141592653589793;
constexpr double PI = 3.141592653589793;

If not, which style is preferred in C++11?

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2 Answers

I believe there is a difference. Let's rename them so that we can talk about them more easily:

const     double PI1 = 3.141592653589793;
constexpr double PI2 = 3.141592653589793;

Both PI1 and PI2 are constant, meaning you can not modify them. However only PI2 is a compile-time constant. It shall be initialized at compiled time. PI1 may be initialized at compile time or run time. Furthermore, only PI2 can be used in a context that requires a compile-time constant. For example:

constexpr double PI3 = PI1;  // error

but:

constexpr double PI3 = PI2;  // ok

and:

static_assert(PI1 == 3.141592653589793, "");  // error

but:

static_assert(PI2 == 3.141592653589793, "");  // ok

As to which you should use? Use whichever meets your needs. Do you want to ensure that you have a compile time constant that can be used in contexts where a compile-time constant is required? Do you want to be able to initialize it with a computation done at run time? Etc.

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4  
Are you sure? Because const int N = 10; char a[N]; works, and array bounds must be compile-time constants. –  FredOverflow Nov 12 '12 at 16:22
2  
I am sure as far as the examples I wrote go (tested each of them before posting). However my compiler does let me convert PI1 to a compile-time integral constant for use in an array, but not for use as a non-type integral template parameter. So the compile-time convertibility of PI1 to an integral type seems a little hit & miss to me. –  Howard Hinnant Nov 12 '12 at 16:26
1  
@FredOverflow: Non-const array indices have "worked" for about a decade (there's for example a g++ extension for that), but that does not mean it's strictly legal C++ (though some more recent C or C++ standard made it legal, I forgot which one). As for differences in compiletime constants, template parameters and use as enum initializer are the only two notable differences between const and constexpr (and neither works for double anyway). –  Damon Nov 12 '12 at 16:53
1  
@Damon: They do not work in Clang though. However size_t const int N = 10; char a[N]; works in C++, but not in C (where you need to #define N 10). –  Matthieu M. Nov 12 '12 at 17:57
1  
Paragraph 4 of 5.19 Constant expressions [expr.const] is also a (non-normative) note that famously outlines that an implementation is allowed to do floating-point arithmetic differently (e.g. with respect to accuracy) at compile-time than at runtime. So 1 / PI1 and 1 / PI2 may yield different results. I don't think this technicality is quite as important as the advice in this answer however. –  Luc Danton Nov 12 '12 at 19:07
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No difference here, but it matters when you have a type that has a constructor.

struct S {
    constexpr S(int);
};

const S s0(0);
constexpr S s1(1);

s0 is a constant, but it does not promise to be initialized at compile-time. s1 is marked constexpr, so it is a constant and, because S's constructor is also marked constexpr, it will be initialized at compile-time.

Mostly this matters when initialization at runtime would be time-consuming and you want to push that work off onto the compiler, where it's also time-consuming, but doesn't slow down execution time of the compiled program

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I agree: the conclusion I arrived to was that constexpr would lead to a diagnosis should the compile-time computation of the object be impossible. What is less clear is whether a function expecting a constant parameter could be executed at compile-time should the parameter be declared as const and not as constexpr: ie, would constexpr int foo(S) be executed at compile-time if I call foo(s0) ? –  Matthieu M. Nov 12 '12 at 16:07
    
@MatthieuM: I doubt whether foo(s0) would be executed at compile-time, but you never know: a compiler is allowed to do such optimizations. Certainly, neither gcc 4.7.2 nor clang 3.2 allow me to compile constexpr a = foo(s0); –  rici Nov 12 '12 at 17:16
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