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Please consider the following mini example

// CFoo.hpp
class CFoo{
private:
    static const double VPI = 0.5;    
public:
    double getVpi();
};

// CFoo.cpp
#include "CFoo.hpp"    
double CFoo::getVpi(){
    double x = -VPI;
    return x;
}

// main.cpp
#include "CFoo.hpp"    
int main(){
    CFoo aFoo();
    return 0;
}

Lining the program with gcc version 4.5.1 produces the error CFoo.cpp: undefined reference to CFoo::VPI. The error dose not occur if

  • VPI is not negated
  • the negation is written as double x = -1 * VPI;
  • Declaration and definition of class CFoo happen in the same file

Do you know the reason for this error?

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1  
This is not valid C++. You cannot initialize non-integral, non-constexpr static class members inline. Make sure you enable and heed all your compiler warnings and compliance features. –  Kerrek SB Nov 12 '12 at 16:11
2  
Compiling with clang gives: warning: in-class initializer for static data member of type 'const double' is a GNU extension –  Xymostech Nov 12 '12 at 16:13
3  
@KerrekSB I know why this is not valid, but this is a question and answer site, so why not give the answer to OP question if you know it ? –  undu Nov 12 '12 at 16:15
1  
@KerrekSB Fair enough. My Bad. –  undu Nov 12 '12 at 16:20
1  
@user93353: And in C++11, arbitrary static constexpr class members can also be initialized inline. But they have to be constexpr (and so does the initializer, I believe). –  Kerrek SB Nov 12 '12 at 16:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are multiple problems with your code. Primarily, this is not valid C++03:

class CFoo{
private:
    static const double VPI = 0.5;    
// ...
};

The declaration of a static data member can specify a constant initializer if and only if that initializer is const integral or const enumeration type. 0.5 is neither of these, and hence your code is not valid C++. 9.4.2 Static data members covers this:

2/ The declaration of a static data member in its class definition is not a definition [...]The definition for a static data member shall appear in a namespace scope enclosing the member’s class definition. [...]

4/ If a static data member is of const integral or const enumeration type, its declaration in the class definition can specify a constant-initializer which shall be an integral constant expression (5.19).

In order to initialize VPI, you must do so in the CPP file:

header:

class CFoo{
private:
    static const double VPI;    
};

cpp :

const double CFoo::VPI = 0.5;

Another problem, unrelated, is here:

int main(){
    CFoo aFoo(); // NOT OK
    return 0;

The expression CFoo aFoo(); doesn't do what you think it does. You think it declares an object aFoo of type CFoo and initializes it using CFoo's default constructor. But what it actually does is declare a function named aFoo taking no parameters, returning a CFoo by value. This is known as the most vexing parse. In order to do what you want, simple omit the parenthesis:

CFoo aFoo;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your detailed and helpful answer. I still don't understand why the linker behaves like that but my original problem is solved. –  Deve Nov 12 '12 at 16:39
1  
Deve: One can never know what will happen in the mysterious world of Undefined Behavior. –  John Dibling Nov 12 '12 at 16:41
    
@Deve: The compiler accepted (failed to diagnose, probably due to partial support of C++11) the initializer in the declaration, but that still leaves the member undefined. When you negate a variable that is not a constant expression (and doubles cannot be constant expressions) that is a use (odr-use in C++11) of the variable and the linker requires the definition, which makes it complain as you did not provide one. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 12 '12 at 18:02

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