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In QT I have a qint64. Is there an easy way of dividing this up into pieces of size int8_t?

For clarity, if I had a

qint64 a = [11001000 00001111 11110000 ... 11001100] 

I would like to get

int8_t a1=[11001000] 
int8_t a2=[00001111]
int8_t a3=[11110000] 
... 
int8_t a8=[11001100]
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is more of a C/C++ question than Qt. But anyway:

qint64 a = 56747234992934;
union {
    qint64 i64;
    int8_t i8[8];
} u = {a};
#if Q_BYTE_ORDER == Q_BIG_ENDIAN
qDebug() << u.i8[0]; // MSB is the first byte on big endian machines
#else
qDebug() << u.i8[7]; // MSB is the last byte on little endian machines
#endif

Edit: To avoid messy endian specific position code:

qint64 a = 56747234992934;
union {
    qint64 i64;
    int8_t i8[8];
} u = {qToBigEndian(a)};
qDebug() << u.i8[0]; // MSB is the first byte on big endian machines

note that you need to include qendian.h for this to work.

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Ugly, but probably the fastest solution if the values will be stored anyway. –  hirschhornsalz Nov 12 '12 at 17:12
    
The downside to that is that you must always check for endianness before accessing a byte. If you want the third-most-significative-byte, it's either u.i8[2] or u.i8[5] depending on the machine. Depending on how often you need to access those bytes, that can quickly lead to messy code. –  Fred Nov 12 '12 at 20:00
    
True. But it's easy to avoid. See my edit. –  Stephen Chu Nov 12 '12 at 20:25
int8_t a1 = a & 0xff00000000000000ll >> 56;
int8_t a2 = a & 0x00ff000000000000ll >> 48;
int8_t a3 = a & 0x0000ff0000000000ll >> 40;
int8_t a4 = a & 0x000000ff00000000ll >> 32;
int8_t a5 = a & 0x00000000ff000000ll >> 24;
int8_t a6 = a & 0x0000000000ff0000ll >> 16;
int8_t a7 = a & 0x000000000000ff00ll >> 8;
int8_t a8 = a & 0x00000000000000ffll;

Make sure to append ll to your constants so they are processed at 64-bits integer.

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Or you can do the shift first and the masking. This way the mask is always 0xFF. –  Stephen Chu Nov 12 '12 at 16:57
    
@StephenChu You don't need any masking at all if you use int8_t. This is C, not Java or something ;-) –  hirschhornsalz Nov 12 '12 at 17:06
    
@Fred: You can completely omit the masks. -1. –  hirschhornsalz Nov 12 '12 at 17:14
    
@hirschhornsalz that's a bit severe –  UmNyobe Nov 12 '12 at 17:21
2  
@StephenChu & hirschhornsalz : I strive for readability. Mask first then shift has the clear advantage of actually showing what is going on. Simply shifting and counting on the compiler to truncate the value obfuscates what you're trying to do and adds zero value to the code. –  Fred Nov 12 '12 at 19:56

This is a destructive solution. It destroys the content of a and maybe some brain tissue of the unwary code reviewer. It is also aesthetically pleasing.

int8_t a8 = a;
int8_t a7 = a >>= 8;
int8_t a6 = a >>= 8;
int8_t a5 = a >>= 8;
int8_t a4 = a >>= 8;
int8_t a3 = a >>= 8;
int8_t a2 = a >>= 8;
int8_t a1 = a >>= 8;

A better solution, probably both in performance and readability and preserves the content of a:

int8_t a8 = a;
int8_t a7 = a >> 8;
int8_t a6 = a >> 16;
int8_t a5 = a >> 24;
int8_t a4 = a >> 32;
int8_t a3 = a >> 40;
int8_t a2 = a >> 48;
int8_t a1 = a >> 56;
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