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I have the following model inheritance structure in Django:

class Parent(models.Model):
    # stuff

class A(Parent):
    # stuff

class B(Parent):
    # stuff

class C(Parent):
    # stuff

and the list goes on.

I am using InheritanceManager of django-model-utils to filter objects like:

Parent.objects.filter(foo=bar).select_subclasses()

This works well when I want to filter all subclasses. What I want to do is to filter A and B objects, but not C objects. I want to do this with a single query like

Parent.objects.filter(foo=bar, __class__.__name__=A, __class__.__name__=B).select_subclasses()

Is it possible to do such a filtering operation, and if possible how?

share|improve this question
    
why not just do A.objects.filter(foo=bar) etc? – Joran Beasley Nov 12 '12 at 16:26
    
I want to filter all objects with a single query, instead of multiple queries – Ozgur Akcali Nov 12 '12 at 18:30

Its usually not considered the best to setup inheritable like that because then each SQL query will have to do a join. That can make your performance much slower. To increase performance, you can use abstract Meta value:

class Parent(models.Model):
    # stuff
    class Meta:
        abstract = True

This way each table is independent and hence performance will be faster.

If that is no applicable to you, I don't think its possible to do something like that in a single query because the fields within the table/model do not contain any information in what table are they located. In that case you will most likely have to somehow subclass the InheritanceManager however I'm not sure what to do there. If you do, using content_types then might be of some help.

If that is too much work, then you can always do a simple hack (more of a monkey patching...). I know its not pretty but it will work:

class Parent(models.Model):
    # stuff
    table = models.CharField(max_length=8, default='parent')

class A(Parent):
    # stuff
    table = models.CharField(max_length=8, default='a')

class B(Parent):
    # stuff
    table = models.CharField(max_length=8, default='b')


# and then something like
# please note that I've never used django-model-utils
# so don't know the correct syntax
Parent.objects.filter(foo=bar, table__in=['parent', 'a']).select_subclasses()
share|improve this answer
    
Ok thanks. I did not use an abstract base class because I wanted the ability to filter base class objects using a single query instead of using a seperate query for each subclass. I just wanted to filter a subset of base classes at some places, and another subset an another place. I'll post here if I find a satisfactory solution – Ozgur Akcali Nov 12 '12 at 18:28

Another hacky solution that's worked for me, without adding more information to the database:

letters = Parent.objects.filter(foo=bar)
for letter in letters:
    if type(letter) == C:
        letters.exclude(id=c.id)

Or, alternatively, if you add information to the models without adding fields:

class Parent(models.Model):
    # stuff

class A(Parent):
    code = 'A'
    # stuff

class B(Parent):
    code = 'B'
    # stuff

class C(Parent):
    code = 'C'
    # stuff

And then...

letters = Parent.objects.filter(foo=bar)
for letter in letters:
    if letter.child().code == 'C':
        letters.exclude(id=c.id)

Works for my purposes, though still a hack...

share|improve this answer

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