Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C++, if I do:

char myArray[] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'}; 

Does that allocate 10 spaces? The last element being '/0'?

What about:

char myArray[9] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'}; 

Did I allocate only 9 spaces in this case? Is this bad?

And, finally, what happens when I do:

char myArray[10] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','/0'}; 
share|improve this question
1  
'/0' is probably not what you meant: it is a multicharacter literal whose value is implementation-defined. Try using '\0' instead. –  Julien Royer Nov 12 '12 at 16:25
add comment

4 Answers 4

char myArray[] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'}; 

Does that allocate 10 spaces? The last element being '/0'?

No. 9.


char myArray[9] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'}; 

Did I allocate only 9 spaces in this case?

Yes.

Is this bad?

No.


and finally what happens when I do

char myArray[10] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','/0'}; 

Assuming you meant '\0', exactly what it looks like.

There's no magic in any of these cases — you get precisely what you're asking for.

Automatic null-termination is something that comes into play with string literals:

char myArray1[10] = "123456789";
char myArray2[9]  = "123456789";  // won't compile - wrong size
char myArray3[]   = "123456789";  // still 10 elements - includes null terminator
share|improve this answer
2  
No exactly what it looks like, since '/0' is a multibyte character literal, which isn't of type char, so it will be converted to type char. Probably this will overflow and weird stuff, or maybe UB if char is signed; I don't know the exact rules. –  rightfold Nov 12 '12 at 16:22
1  
Silly as it sounds, I can't think of a better answer for this weird question... –  Kerrek SB Nov 12 '12 at 16:22
    
@Aardvark: Hah, true. Identified it. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 12 '12 at 16:22
    
@KerrekSB: Not silly at all! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 12 '12 at 16:23
1  
@Aardvark A multibyte character literal has type int with implementation-defined value. If char is signed: if the value fits in a char, that value is in the array; otherwise, further implementation-defined behaviour. If char is unsigned: the value in the array will be the multibyte value modulo 2^n. Not worth playing in this maze of ID behaviour. :D –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 12 '12 at 16:45
add comment

No, you'll only get the trailing NUL when using a string literal, i.e.:

// Array of 10 bytes
char myArray[] = "123456789";

// same as:
char myArray[] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','\0'}; 
share|improve this answer
add comment
char myArray[] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'}; 

This only allocates 9 elements.

char myArray[9] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'}; 

Yes, this line also allocates 9 elements.

char myArray[10] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','/0'}; 

The last one should be '\0' instead of '/0'.

What you are thinking about should be

char myArray[] = "123456789";

which allocates 10 characters (1 for the trailing '\0' at the end of the string literal)

share|improve this answer
add comment

char arrays don't behave differently than any other arrays when you use list-initialization. Would you expect

int x[] = {1,2};

to magically append a 0 as the last element and make x have 3 elements?

In case you provide fewer elements, then the last ones are value-initialized, so

char myArray[10] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'}; 

would be null-terminated, but

char myArray[9] = {'1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9'}; 

isn't.

share|improve this answer
3  
Your second code fragment would just have 0, not '\0'. –  Gaminic Nov 12 '12 at 16:27
2  
@Gaminic and they're different how? The octal 0 is the same as the char \0. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 12 '12 at 16:30
    
@Gaminic: If you're the downvoter, you just downvoted a 100% correct post. Shame! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 12 '12 at 17:18
    
I didn't downvote (proof: I don't have the points required!). I didn't know those two were the same, so I stand corrected. –  Gaminic Nov 12 '12 at 18:56
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.