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I have a struct like the following:

typedef struct {
    player *lastmover;
    player *previous;
} lastmove;


typedef struct {
     int moves;
     char *name;
} player;

I try do a memory alloc like this so the :

lastmove lmv;
lmv.lastmover=malloc(sizeof(player *));
lmv.previous=malloc(sizeof(player *));
.....
callfunction(&lmv);
.....

then in another place i use a pointer lmvp (lastmover *) and do assignment like this:

void
callfuntion(lastmove *)
{
      .....
      lmvp->previous=lmvp->lastmover;
      lmvp->lastmover=p;     //where p is of type (player *)
      .....
}

this all works fine, but I don't know how to control weather previous mover is initialized. In the first game move in the program the lastmover variable (player *) is initialized, but the previous variable that is assigned to NULL(or garbage?) lmvp->previous=lmvp->lastmover;. But I want somehow to check if the previous mover is initialized or not. Im trying this:

void
callfunction(lastmove *)
{
     ......
     ......
     if(lmvp->previous!=NULL)
     ......
}

But im quite certain it will not do.. How is the best way to control this?

share|improve this question
    
Just make sure you explicitly make the pointer NULL every time lastmover does not exist and it should work fine. –  Alok Save Nov 12 '12 at 16:58
    
Shouldn't it be lmv.lastmover=malloc(sizeof(player)); (and not player *)? –  ArjunShankar Nov 12 '12 at 17:00
    
@Als but thats the problem I don't know how to check if the lastmover exist or not –  patriques Nov 12 '12 at 17:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you're only allocating size of pointer, this

lmv.lastmover=malloc(sizeof(player *));

Should be

lmv.lastmover=malloc(sizeof(player));

this all works fine

it shouldn't :)

Edit: if you only assign a pointer to lastmover then you don't need to allocate memory at all, otherwise it's a memory leak, now if you want to check if it's initialized then initialize it to NULL

lastmove lmv = {0};
//or
lmv.lastmover= NULL;
lmv.previous= NULL;
...
//later
if(lmv->previous!=NULL)

A third way to do it, in C99, is using designated initializers:

lastmove lmv = {
   .lastmover= NULL;
   .previous= NULL;
};
share|improve this answer
    
But I have run the code and it actually works. I never assign a player type to the lastmover. I only assign pointers to it. Isn't that ok? –  patriques Nov 12 '12 at 17:03
1  
@patriques if you only assign pointers, then you don't need to allocate memory at all. –  mux Nov 12 '12 at 17:04
1  
In fact, if you allocate memory and assign it to a pointer, then overwrite the pointer (make it point elsewhere), you 'leak' allocated memory. Also: Learn to love valgrind. –  ArjunShankar Nov 12 '12 at 17:06
    
@ArjunShankar thanks, mentioned that. –  mux Nov 12 '12 at 17:09
1  
A better idiom is to use lmv.lastmover=malloc(sizeof *lmv.lastmover); instead of lmv.lastmover=malloc(sizeof(player));. It will always work, even if the type of lastmover changes. –  tomlogic Nov 12 '12 at 17:37

use this:

lmv.lastmover=malloc(sizeof(player)); 
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry i forgot to say that lmv is by now a pointer to a lastmover. I updated the question, but thank you for pointing it out –  patriques Nov 12 '12 at 17:06
    
@patriques: got it, edited.. my answer too –  Omkant Nov 12 '12 at 17:09
    
A better idiom is to use lmv.lastmover=malloc(sizeof *lmv.lastmover); instead of lmv.lastmover=malloc(sizeof(player));. It will always work, even if the type of lastmover changes. –  tomlogic Nov 12 '12 at 17:38

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