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I have the following and at some point I need to create Failures for Validations. We suppose each type deriving from Validation has one and only one type deriving from Failure<T> where T is the aforementioned implementation of Validation.

As I have a growing number of implementations of Validation, I need to be able to instantiate the right type deriving from Failure<T>, and call the link method on it within a method that looks like

void recordFailureForValidation(Validation v) {
   Type failureType = dict[v.GetType()];
   Object failure = Activator.CreateInstance(failureType);
       // how do I call failure.link(v) ?
}

At Runtime, a dictionary gives me the type deriving from Failure<T> given T. I am able to instantiate Failure<T> (Failure1, Failure2, etc...), but I can't find how to call link on the public field reference of my newly created Failure instance (by making all uses that made sense to me of GetMethod, MakeGenericMethod, Invoke, etc...)

public class MyReferenceClass<T>
  where T : Object, new() {
   public void link(T arg) { ... }
}

public abstract class Failure<T>
   where T : ValidationRule, new() {
...
   public MyReferenceClass<T> reference;
...
}

public class Failure1 : Failure<Validation1> {
}

public class Failure2 : Failure<Validation2> {
}


public abstract class ValidationRule {
   ...
}

public class ValidationRule1 : ValidationRule {
...
}

public class ValidationRule2 : ValidationRule {
...
}
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Where does the instance of MyReferenceClass<T> come from in your example? That's the one you will be calling the link method on, right? –  fsimonazzi Nov 12 '12 at 17:25
    
yes, I instantiate the class implementing Failure<T>, after which I'd like to call link(v) on it. –  Franklin Nov 12 '12 at 17:28
    
It's not clear where the field comes into it. If you could post a short but complete example, e.g. with a hard-coded version, that would really help. –  Jon Skeet Nov 12 '12 at 17:34
    
I have added a couple of lines in the method that I am writing, maybe that defines my issue better ? –  Franklin Nov 12 '12 at 17:46
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

link is private since you do not specify a different accessibility. Make it public or internal:

public class MyReferenceClass<T>
  where T : Object, new() {
   public void link(T arg) { ... }
}

then you can call it from Failure<T> through the reference property:

public abstract class Failure<T>
   where T : ValidationRule, new()
{
    protected T Validation {get; set;};
    public MyReferenceClass<T> reference;
}

public class Failure1 : Failure<Validation1>
{
    public void Test()
    {
        this.reference.link(Validation);
    }
}
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sorry that was a typo. It is actually 'public' in my code. Updated question. –  Franklin Nov 12 '12 at 17:38
    
problem is that I can't cast my instance with (Failure<>) –  Franklin Nov 12 '12 at 18:06
    
What are you trying to cast it to? –  D Stanley Nov 12 '12 at 18:17
    
I'd like to cast to (Failure<>), so that I can call "link(v)" on the instance. –  Franklin Nov 12 '12 at 18:38
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Let Failures implement a non generic IFailure interface as well as a generic one in the same manner as IEnumerable and IEnumerable<T>

Create an abstract factory method within ValidationRule that has to be implemented by each concrete Validation

public ValidationRule1 : ValidationRule
{
    public override IFailure ToFailure()
    {
        return new Failure1(this);
    }

    ...
}
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