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Just wondering if there is any difference with the two below code examples:

$image = 'http://www.example.com/image.jpg'

$photo = file_get_contents($image);

ob_start();
header("Content-type: image/jpeg");
print($photo);
ob_end_flush(); 

or...

$image = 'http://www.example.com/image.jpg'

$photo = file_get_contents($image);

ob_start();
header("Content-type: image/jpeg");
readfile($photo);
ob_end_flush();
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The second snippet doesn't work, unless readfile($image); was meant. Also, I would never use output buffering for this. –  Ja͢ck Nov 12 '12 at 17:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

readfile's parameter is a filename, not the content itself. Therefore, you'd call it like this:

$image = 'http://www.example.com/image.jpg'
ob_start();
header("Content-type: image/jpeg");
readfile($image);
ob_end_flush();

Since readfile reads and write chunks at a time, its memory consumption will be constant, whereas when you store the result of file_get_contents into $photo, you'll need to have enough memory to store the image.

In your case, the output buffering makes the file_get_contents variant demand twice as much memory as the image's size. For a large image, readfile therefore halves the memory requirements. Note that your output buffering means that the download will be delayed. If you don't need it for anything else, you will get better performance (both in actual speed and server memory requirements) if you simply disable it:

$image = 'http://www.example.com/image.jpg'
header("Content-type: image/jpeg");
if (@readfile($image) === false) {
   // print error image
}
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Thanks for that. It's code within a current script that uses print to do it and since I had used readfile in the past to display images I forgot it took a filename. Unfortunately can't disable the output buffering as much of the script uses it. :( –  Brett Nov 12 '12 at 17:40

There is a very significant difference in that readfile takes the filename as the argument.

The second snippet should be something like

$image = ...
readfile($image)

This has the advantage of not having to store the entire file contents in memory (a string) since readfile emits it immediately. Of course, if you buffer the output that is no longer true.

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Ok, I understand it now. Basically print takes the data from file_get_contents and outputs it, whilst readfile kinda does both at once without having to store it somewhere. –  Brett Nov 12 '12 at 17:33

In the first instance your code would never work

  readfile($photo);
              ^--------------- Takes file name not string 

PHP DOC SAYS

Reads a file and writes it to the output buffer.

You don't need to re event that and duplicate that with multiple other functions its just saying

 readfile = file_get_contents + print 

It just like using fopen instead of file_get_contents just a get a simple content in a file

Lastly readfile is faster tested with 10000 loop on same image

Single Run
Array
(
    [m1] => 0.0006101131439209
    [m2] => 0.00031208992004395
)
Dual Run
Array
(
    [m1] => 3.4585757255554   
    [m2] => 2.9963381290436   <---- Faster 
)

m1 & m2 functions

function m1($array) {
    $photo = file_get_contents('a.png');
    ob_start();
    print($photo);
    ob_end_clean();
}

// Array clean copy
function m2($array) {
    ob_start();
    readfile('a.png');
    ob_end_clean();
}
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1  
Yep, accidentally glanced over that fact. Thanks! –  Brett Nov 12 '12 at 17:34

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