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When I try "cal | tail -6" in my unix machine, I get -

             1  2  3
 4  5  6  7  8  9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30

but when I try "cal | tail -6 | awk '{print $7}'", I get -

10
17
24

where is 3 going ? My requirement is basically all weekdays i.e column 2,3,4,5 & 6. But I'm getting wrong output because of the strange behavior of "cal"

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6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since all of your columns in each row are three characters wide, you could use this to extract the days you wish for. For example, if you wanted only the 7th day in a column, you could do the following:

cal | sed 's/^\(.\{18\}\).*$/\1/'

This command would remove the first 18 characters in the line, which are the entries for the first 6 days of the week.

To extract a particular day, such as the fourth day, you could do this:

cal | sed 's/^.\{9\}\(.\{3\}\).*$/\1/'

To remove the first day of the week and the last day, you could do this:

cal | sed -e 's/^.\{3\}//' -e 's/^\(.\{15\}\).\{3\}$/\1/'
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Thanks.. works for me.. but I noticed something in your last command, it deletes the last day of the month even if it is not a sat/sun. –  kaustav datta Nov 13 '12 at 10:24
    
Thanks. Edited. –  djhaskin987 Nov 13 '12 at 13:16
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There are only 3 whitespace delimited columns in your first row. cal is working exactly as corrected, you are not understanding how awk works. As far as awk is concerned there is no 7th column in your first row as it yields attention to whitespace delimited columns, not fixed width columns.

A quick google search reveals you can use

BEGIN  { FIELDWIDTHS = "3 3 3 3 3 3 3" }

In your awk script.

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any work around for this problem ? i want the days under sat/sun etc –  kaustav datta Nov 12 '12 at 17:34
    
+1 This is an excellent way to fix this problem. Then under a normal awk block, you can manipulate the days with the field variables $1 - $7. @djechlin, perhaps if you provided the rest of the awk script as an example? –  djhaskin987 Nov 13 '12 at 13:18
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May be a row-wise extraction will do the trick. Try ncal. For example:

$ ncal
November 2012
Mo     5 12 19 26
Tu     6 13 20 27
We     7 14 21 28
Th  1  8 15 22 29
Fr  2  9 16 23 30
Sa  3 10 17 24
Su  4 11 18 25
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or fill the absent dates with place holder (with '-' for example):

kent$  cal -s|tail -6|awk 'NR==1&&NF<7{gsub(/^ */,"");for(i=1;i<=(7-NF);i++) x=" - "x;$0=x" "$0;}1'                       
 -  -  -  -  1  2  3
 4  5  6  7  8  9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30

then you could get the column, replace '-' with " " if needed. e.g. for $7:

  kent$  cal -s|tail -6|awk 'NR==1&&NF<7{gsub(/^ */,"");for(i=1;i<=(7-NF);i++) x=" - "x;$0=x" "$0;}{print $7}'   
3
10
17
24
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The bash way:

First, what's the 1st Sunday of this month:

day=$(($(date +%m/01\ 01:00:00|date -f - +7-%w)))

Then now, all Sunday for this month:

while date +%m/$day|date -f - &>/dev/null ;do echo $day;((day+=7));done
3
10
17
24

Have fun! ;-)

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Note that todays date is highlighted unless you turn it off (-h). Use cut to extract the wanted columns:

cal -h | cut -c19-20

Output:

Sa
 3
10
17
24
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