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I have worked on Python and I know that to concatenate a string to be --- you can simply "multiply" an integer by the char "-", so in this case we can simply do it like result=3*"-". I am stuck on trying to do this in C language.

How can I do this in C, for example:

#include <stdio.h>
int main (void)
{

    int height=0;
    int n=0;
    char symbol='#';
    printf("Height: ");
    scanf("%d",&height);
    n=height+1;
    while (n>=2)
        {
        printf("symbol*n");
        n=n-1;
        }
    return 0;
}

So it prints an inverted pyramid for height=5:

#####
####
###
##
#

Thank you in advance!!

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2 Answers 2

There isn't a built-in way to repeat the output like that. You have to code it yourself.

void multiputchar(char c, size_t count)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        putchar(c);
}

For a library function, you might care about whether putchar() fails, so you might be better to write:

int multiputchar(char c, size_t count)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        if (putchar(c) == EOF)
            return(EOF);
    }
    return (unsigned char)c;
}

But if the return value will always be ignored, the first is simpler. The cast is necessary to ensure that if your char type is signed, you can tell the difference between a failure and successful output of ÿ (y-umlaut, U+00FF, LATIN SMALL LETTER Y WITH DIAERESIS, 0xFF in 8859-1 and related code sets).

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that was a quick answer, THANK YOU! –  Fernando Paulin Nov 12 '12 at 18:16
    
return EOF; is better style than return(EOF); which tricks novice developers into thinking return is a built in function of some sort. –  AAA Nov 12 '12 at 21:31
    
@djechlin I suppose that's possible for an extreme novice to mistake, but it's 2012 and everyone should have syntax highlighting. Besides, while it may be superfluous here, I personally like to wrap complex returns in parentheses, and maybe he just fell into that habit –  im so confused Nov 12 '12 at 21:45

In C, you also need to handle the memory you use. So if you wanted a "---" string, you would also need to allocate space for that string. Once allocated the space, you would fill it with the given character.

And afterwards, you'd have to free the area.

So:

char *charmul(char c, int n)
{
    int i;
    char *buffer; // Buffer to allocate
    buffer = malloc(n+1); // To store N characters we need N bytes plus a zero
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
        buffer[i] = c;
    buffer[n] = 0;
    return buffer;
}

Then we'd need to add error checking:

char *charmul(char c, int n)
{
    int i;
    char *buffer; // Buffer to allocate
    buffer = malloc(n+1); // To store N characters we need N bytes plus a zero
    if (NULL == buffer)
         return NULL;
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
        buffer[i] = c;
    buffer[n] = 0;
    return buffer;
}

Your source would become:

#include <stdio.h>

// charmul here

int main (void)
{

    int height=0;
    int n=0;
    char symbol='#';
    printf("Height: ");
    scanf("%d",&height);
    n=height+1;
    while (n>=2)
        {
            char *s;
            s = charmul(symbol, n);
            printf("%s\n", s);
            free(s); s = NULL;
            n=n-1;
        }
    return 0;
}

An alternative implementation would seek to reduce the number of malloc's, to enhance performance. To do so you'd need to also pass to the function a pointer to the previous buffer, which, if shorter, could be recycled with no need for a further malloc, and if longer, would be free'd and reallocated (or one could use realloc). You would then do a free() only of the last nonrecycled value:

char *charmul_recycle(char c, int n, char *prevbuf)
{
    int i;
    if (prevbuf && (n > strlen(*prevbuf)))
    {
        free(prevbuf); prevbuf = NULL;
    }
    if ((NULL == prevbuf)
    { 
        prevbuf = malloc(n+1); // To store N characters we need N bytes plus a zero
        if (NULL == prevbuf)
            return NULL;
    }
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
        prevbuf[i] = c;
    prevbuf[n] = 0;
    return prevbuf;
}


char *buffer = NULL;

while(n > 2)
{
     buffer = charmul_recycle(symbol, n, buffer);
     if (NULL == buffer)
     {
         fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
         abort();
     }
     printf("%s\n", buffer);
     n--;
}

Of course the whole thing can be done with a single straight allocation and a progressive shortening of the string (by placing s[n] to be zero), but then we wouldn't be using the "generating multiple character" features:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main (void)
{
    char *string;
    int height=0;
    int n=0;
    char symbol='#';
    printf("Height: ");
    scanf("%d",&height);
    n=height+1;
    string = malloc(n);        // allocate just enough memory (n is height+1)
    memset(string, symbol, n); // fill string with symbols

    while (--n) // with n ever decreasing...
    {
        string[n] = 0;            // Truncate string after n characters
        printf("%s\n", string);   // output string
    }
    free(string); // string = NULL; // finally free the string
    return 0;
}

Update (thanks to Jonathan Leffler): above, there's a potentially dangerous "overoptimization". Immediately before each use of string, string is correctly zero-terminated ("string[n] = 0;"). But it remains true that I have allocated a string variable and filled it with stuff, and did not immediately zero-terminate it. In the above code, it all works out perfectly. It's still bad coding practice, because if the code was reused and the cycle removed, and the string used for some other purpose (which in this case is unlikely, but still...), the nonterminated string might become a subtle bug.

The quickest fix is to slap a termination after the allocation:

    string = malloc(n);        // allocate just enough memory (n is height+1)
    memset(string, symbol, n-1); // fill string with symbols
    string[n-1] = 0;           // zero-terminate string

I've now wandered far from the original topic, but this would mean that in this instance the string is correctly zero-terminated twice. To avoid this, the code can be rewritten into a "cut and paste safe" version, also more clearly showing the extra zero as addition to n:

    n=height;                   // Number of characters
    string = malloc(n+1);       // Allocate memory for characters plus zero
    memset(string, symbol, n);  // Store the characters
    string[n] = 0;              // Store the zero
    while (n)                   // While there are characters
    {
        printf("%s\n", string); // Print the string
        string[--n] = 0;        // Reduce it to one character less than before
    }

The cycle now accepts any valid string with meaningful n, and if it is removed, the string is left in a useable state.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your quick answer! :) –  Fernando Paulin Nov 12 '12 at 18:17
1  
Since you didn't use calloc(), you need to ensure the string is null terminated after (or before) the memset() in the last version of the code. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 12 '12 at 22:41
    
It is - string[n] = 0; sees to that (now that I look more closely, I'm allocating one extra byte needlessly, though). –  lserni Nov 13 '12 at 7:26
    
@JonathanLeffler: even so, the code did stink. Thanks for the heads-up. I've added a digression, maybe it could interest someone. –  lserni Nov 13 '12 at 7:43
    
I agree that your code was technically safe in the context given, but also agree that it was not copy'n'paste safe. You've done a good job explaining what I overlooked. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 13 '12 at 7:46

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