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I'm compressing a binary stream that's made of packets

A packet is composed of 256 32-bit integers (samples). The thing is that most integers change only a few bits from the previous integer (typically 0 - 4 bits change at most from the previous sample in the stream).

Here is an example:

3322 2222 2222 1111 1111 1110 0000 0000    BIT POSITIONS
1098 7654 3210 9817 6543 2109 8765 4321
--------------------------------------------------------
1100 1001 1110 0010 0001 0101 0110 1101    Sample 1  
               *                   * 
1100 1001 1110 1010 0001 0101 0110 0101    Sample 2     changes: bit 19, 4

1100 1001 1110 1010 0001 0101 0110 0101    Sample 3     changes: none
     *            *            *   
1100 0001 1110 1011 0001 0101 0010 0101    Sample 4     changes: bit 27, 17, 7
...

My current, lossles-compression scheme is based around nibbles. Basically I'm using a control byte where I'm encoding -using single bits- which nibbles changed from the previous sample; If there's a change, I'll include the modified nibbles on the compression stream, otherwise they will be reconstructed from the previous sample upon decompression.

Here is how the example stream I provided would be compressed:

Control Byte: 11111111     // all nibbles change, since this is first sample
Data:         1100 1001 1110 0010 0001 0101 0110 1101 // data for all nibbles
Control Byte: 00010001     // only nibbles 3 and 7 have changes
Data:         1010 0101    // data for nibbles 3 and 7
Control Byte: 00000000     // no nibbles are changing
Data:                      // no data is required
Control Byte: 01010010     // nibbles 1, 3 and 6 have changes
Data:         0001 1011 0010   // nibbles 1, 3 and 6
...

Using this scheme, we have a fixed overhead of 256 bytes (the control bytes), with an average, variable compressed-data length of 260 bytes (the nibbles that are changing from sample to sample). Considering the uncompressed packet is 1024 bytes in length, this is practically giving us a 50% average compression rate.

This is not bad, but my gut feeling is that a much better approach is possible. Is anybody aware of a better compression strategy that exploits the fact that very few bits change from sample to sample? Lossy compression is an alternative as long as the bit-error rate after decompression is small (less than 3%) - for this particular data stream, the numerical weight of the bit positions is irrelevant, so an error ocurring in the higher bits is of no concern at all.

Thanks everyone in advance!

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Is the order of samples within the packet important? If not, you could sort within each packet to minimize the number of control bytes. –  cmh Nov 12 '12 at 18:31
    
@cmh, good suggestion - unfortunately the order or the samples is relevant :( –  user1222021 Nov 12 '12 at 18:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your best bet is to use existing techniques (e.g, Lempel-Ziv-Welch; flate) or precede such a method with difference coding (probably better). With difference coding you're replacing every byte (except the first) with the difference between that byte and the one before. Now you should get lots of zeroes, and a few small values interspersed. Huffman coding or something like LZW will compress down the string of mostly zeroes quite thoroughly.

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@RVic: +1 This looks very promising. It is a fact that using difference encoding, we end up with a mostly zero bit string. We'll definitely try this. =) –  user1222021 Nov 12 '12 at 18:50
    
Wow, using my original technique, a 24 hour stream measured around 14MB. Using your suggestion of difference encoding followed by LZMA. A 24 hour file measures 37KB ! I'm overwhelmed with joy! –  user1222021 Nov 14 '12 at 0:53
    
Thank you very much for your suggestion @DRVic. And also thanks to everyone who gave such smart suggestions, the idea of difference encoding (xor) basically suggested by everyone didn't cross my mind before. –  user1222021 Nov 14 '12 at 0:55
    
I'm competely baffled, first test result was using a textual representation of the difference coding. A binary file containing the XOR results was squeezed from 29MB to 5KB! –  user1222021 Nov 14 '12 at 18:45

If you send first integer uncompressed and for other 255 integers compute XOR between this and preceding integer, you'll get a stream of bits where nonzero bits are very rare. This bit stream may be encoded with Arithmetic coding.

If after computing XOR between neighbor values we have a bit stream where bits are independent from each other (each "0" or "1" bit has the same probability, independent on bit position in the integer and independent on integer position in the packet), arithmetic coding guarantees optimal lossless compression rate.

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+1 - also giving a try to Arithmetic coding. Thanks –  user1222021 Nov 12 '12 at 19:05

You could do an XOR on the input data. Because only a few bits change, this will give you results consisting mostly of 0 with a few 1 in between.

1100 1001 1110 0010 0001 0101 0110 1101    Sample 1  
1100 1001 1110 1010 0001 0101 0110 0101    Sample 2     
1100 1001 1110 1010 0001 0101 0110 0101    Sample 3     
1100 0001 1110 1011 0001 0101 0010 0101    Sample 4     

After the start value this would yield a sequence

0b0000 0000 0000 1000 0000 0000 0001 0000, 
0b0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000, 
0b0000 1000 0000 0010 0000 0000 1000 0000

You could now use various standard compression algorithms. Huffman encoding of 8 byte sequences, LZW or entropy encoding, but a good try might be a simple bit run length encoding, counting the zero bits between each one bit from bit position 0 on:

4, 14, 51, 9, 9

If you limit your run length to 30 and choose an escape symbol 31, meaning "add 31 to the next run length", you get

4, 14, 31, 20, 9, 9

This would be 6*5 bits for the whole sequence. You could now do Huffmann encoding on that...

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My idea is similar to that of Evgeny Kluev. First integer is send uncompressed, the rest becomes XOR of itself and previous integer.

1100 1001 1110 0010 0001 0101 0110 1101    Sample 1  
               *                   * 
0000 0000 0000 1000 0000 0000 0000 1000    Sample 2

0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000    Sample 3
     *            *            *   
0000 1000 0000 0001 0000 0000 0100 0000    Sample 4

Now instead of dividing the sparse data into blocks and do Arithmetic Encoding right here, I transform the data further. Because really, arithmetic encoding is based on frequency of data being unequal. And looking at this, do you think

0000 0000 0000 1000 0000 0000 0000 1000

will appear more often than

0000 1000 0000 0001 0000 0000 0100 0000

or vice versa?

Okay, so here is how I'm going to transform the data further. Let the rest of data become a sequence of numbers describing the number of consecutive zeros. For example, the data becomes:

1100 1001 1110 0010 0001 0101 0110 1101    Sample 1  followed by decimals
12, 15, 39, 10, 9, 6

Now you can perform Arithmetic encoding on those trailing decimals. This time the frequency will make sense! Because you said in the question that there are little changes, meaning the higher number of consecutive zeros will appear more often.

EDIT: This answer is exactly the same as that of hirschhornsalz. except he also mentioned that you can put a limit on maximum number of zeros and split them...

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From your example it seems that the few bits that change are not always the same (e.g. always the lowest 4). So I would suggest a simple run length encoding of the bits on the transposed array. Without having a distribution of your numbers/data, I would suggest to start with 4 bits for the length, but there you could try a little bit with some of your example inputs.

The pseudocode (for compression) would look like this:

 for bitpos = 0 to 31
     for datapos = 0 to 255 
         BitString.append(getbit(data[datapos], bitpos);
     endfor
 endfor

 result="";
 pos = 0;
 while (notEndOfString)
     # count 1s
     count = 0;
     while (pos < 32*256 AND count < 16 AND BitString[pos]==1)
         count++;
         pos++;
         endwhile
     result.append4BitNumber(count);
     # count 0s
     count = 0;
     while (pos < 32*256 AND count < 16 AND BitString[pos]==0)
         count++;
         pos++;
         endwhile
     result.append4BitNumber(count);
 endwhile

Maybe one could increase the compression by applying afterwards Lempel-Ziv or a Huffman encoding - but without more information about the distribution of the input data one can not say more (this holds for this problem in general - with a better information of the input data, one could tailor some kind of compression to it).

EDIT: Another easy approach would be to make an encoding of the changing bit positions: You start with your initial 32 bit word, then you store for every data word 3 bits defining how much bits change (i.e. 0..7), and afterwards you store 0..7 times 4 bits where the 4 bits encode the position of the chaning bit. That means when e.g. on average 2 bits change you need for your 32*256 bit packet 32+255*(3+8)=2837 => approx 35% of its original size.

If you often have the same numbers of bits changing, some of these 4 bits pattern would appear very often, while others not at all => a Huffman coding on these 4 bits-groups would compress it optimal (if you know that these pattern probabilities would never change, you could even make a static Huffman tree, so you dont have to store it).

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