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I have a PHP graphs page that displays graphs generated from another PHP file.

This graph generating PHP file will have its variables changed through an AJAX script.

When the PHP graphs page first loads i need to be able to identify whether a variable in the generating PHP file is empty so i can change it to a default value until data overwrites it through the $_get function.

I have tried this so far with no luck and am a bit stuck, any assistance would be greatly appreciated as i am very new to PHP. thanks :)

$course = $_GET['usercourse'];

if (empty($course))
{
    $course = 'All';
}

else
{
}
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3  
$course = isset($_GET['usercourse']) ? $_GET['usercourse'] : "All"; –  Salman A Nov 12 '12 at 18:45
    
@SalmanA You should post that as an answer, especially since it's the best thing written on this question so far. (It's depressing how much misinformation has been answered on this question...) –  Corbin Nov 12 '12 at 18:50
1  
Notices aside, the posted code should work unless you want to distinguish between usercourse being passed as empty string or 0 and not being passed at all. What doesn't work for you? –  Jack Nov 12 '12 at 18:54
    
@SalmanA got it all working thanks to you –  Matastic Nov 12 '12 at 18:58
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6 Answers

Use the isset() function.

if (isset($_GET['usercourse'])
{
    //do something
}
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't isset be the same as empty in this case? –  woz Nov 12 '12 at 18:39
2  
@woz php is odd language. it have isset, empty and is_null function that basically do the same thing, but are different. –  Steve Nov 12 '12 at 18:41
1  
No, empty isn't the same in this context (assuming you both mean !empty()). Imagine $_GET['usercourse'] === '0': (!empty($_GET['usercourse'])) === false, but isset($_GET['usercourse']) === true –  Corbin Nov 12 '12 at 18:42
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Use isset() function.

if (isset($_GET['usercourse'])
{
    //do something
}
share|improve this answer
    
This could use some clarification. If $course were only defined inside of the first if, this could issue a notice for an undefined variable. –  Corbin Nov 12 '12 at 18:51
    
@Corbin please check my updated answer –  Aryan Nov 12 '12 at 18:56
    
Still wrong. What happens if $_GET['usercourse'] isn't defined? You'll get an undefined index warning. –  Corbin Nov 12 '12 at 19:09
    
@Corbin so better to use isset –  Aryan Nov 12 '12 at 19:10
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Use isset function, like this,

if(isset($_GET['usercourse']))
$course = $_GET['usercourse'];

if (empty($course))
{
$course = 'All';
} else {
 //do something...
 }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Naive code example that checks if the variable was set and it is not equal to empty string:

$course = isset($_GET['usercourse']) && $_GET['usercourse'] !== ''
    ? $_GET['usercourse']
    : 'All';

Slightly better:

$course = isset($_GET['usercourse']) && preg_match('@^(LIST|of|AccEPtabLE|vaLUes)$@i', $_GET['usercourse'])
    ? $_GET['usercourse']
    : 'All';

$course = isset($_GET['usercourse']) && in_array($_GET['usercourse'], array('list', 'of', 'acceptable', 'values'))
    ? $_GET['usercourse']
    : 'All';

Even better:

Use Filter Functions.

share|improve this answer
    
If he's going to check against a delineated white list, it would make more sense to have an array of $allowed = ...; and then check in_array instead. –  Corbin Nov 12 '12 at 18:55
    
Yes, agreed...! –  Salman A Nov 12 '12 at 18:56
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Other answers have answered your direct question, but I think there's something deeper here that should be explained.

You typically want to avoid accessing array indexes that you are not certain exist.

For example:

$a = array('foo' => 'bar');
echo $a['test']; //bad!

The same applies for $_GET, $_POST, $_COOKIE, etc. Don't access indexes unless you know that they exist.

Note that for user defined indexes, this translates to "don't access indexes unless you've checked that they exist."

$content = $_GET['content']; //ALWAYS wrong

You have three options for checking array indexes: isset, empty, and array_key_exists.

isset($x) returns true iff $x is non-null. isset is essentially equivalent to: $x !== null, except isset will not issue undefined index/variable notices.

(empty($x) === (!isset($x) || !$x))

In other words, empty consider anything loosely equal to false to be empty. This is useful in certain situations.

array_key_exists($key, $array) is a simple guarantee that $array[$key] will not issue an undefined index notice.

So what's the easiest way to extract user input in a proper manner?

$content = (isset($_GET['content'])) ? $_GET['content'] : null;

You have an imporant guarantee at this point in that $content !== null iff the user provided input.


Note that you should also avoid ever having an excecution path that leaves a variable undefined:

if (isset($_GET['content'])) {
    $content = $_GET['content'];
}

echo $content; //WRONG - $content is not guaranteed to be defined

You could use $content in that situation if it were wrapped in isset or empty, but that hampers the readability of code. If you want to leave a variable undefined under some condition, define it as null. That leaves it as 'undefined' without it issuing variable doesn't exist warnings.

$a = null;
var_dump($a === $b); //true, because the non-existent $b is treated as false
//(note that this is terrible style though -- this would issue a variable doesn't exist warning for $b

There's also, of course, PHP's filter extension. In particular, you can use filter_input to avoid rewriting a lot of the code for handling user input.

You can read more about proper (or, paranoid, as some may call it) input handling here or here in the proper sections.


As an aside, you should always develop with errors cranked all the way up, and you should be monitoring for any kind of error (warning, notice, etc). This will help prevent potential logical bugs, and it tends to keep code clean. (There seems to be a correlation between code that never issues notices and well written code.)

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer - not only answers the question but gives a proper explanation of all the factors involved. –  PWhite Nov 12 '12 at 19:35
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why not compare against an empty string?

if (!isset($course) || empty($course) ) {
    $course = 'All';
}
share|improve this answer
3  
empty() would return true for an empty string, thus making the OR condition totally redundant. –  Mike Brant Nov 12 '12 at 18:43
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