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I am building a calculator that uses two sliders like this:

enter image description here

I have a range of CPU and RAM data that is stored in an object like this:

var CloudPlans = {
   small: {

        id: 'small',

        from: {
            cpu: 1,
            ram: 1
        },

        to: {
            cpu: 2,
            ram: 2
        },

        price: {
            linux: 3490,
            windows: 4190
        }
    },

    medium:  {

        id: 'medium',

        from: {
            cpu: 2,
            ram: 2
        },

        to: {
            cpu: 4,
            ram: 4
        },

        price: {
            linux: 5600,
            windows: 6300
        }

    },

    large: {

        id: 'large',

        from: {
            cpu: 4,
            ram: 4
        },

        to: {
            cpu: 6,
            ram: 8
        },

        price: {
            linux: 9500,
            windows: 10200
        }

    },

           [...more configs here]

}

Now based on the position and value of the slider, I have to check which plan the user has selected and then calculate the price of the components. Here is the function that checks the price range:

    checkPlaninRange: function(cpuVal, ramVal) {
        if(cpuVal >= CloudPlan.small.from.cpu && cpuVal <= CloudPlan.small.to.cpu ) {
            return "small";
        } else if (ramVal >= CloudPlan.small.from.cpu && ramVal <= CloudPlan.small.to.cpu) {
            return "small";
        }
    }

As you can see I will be dealing with almost an endless list of conditionals to return the selected plan. Is there any way to simplify the storage or selection of these plan configs based on code other than conditionals or case statements?

share|improve this question
1  
You have a collection of conditionals, all the same: iterate over them. The "id" appears redundant so far. – Dave Newton Nov 12 '12 at 18:55
    
Are you sure your checkPlaninRange does really do what you want? Apart from comparing ramVal to the cpu property, it does return "small" if only one of the conditions is met. – Bergi Nov 12 '12 at 18:58
    
well..it returns any one of 'large' and 'extralarge' and so on provided the RIGHT conditions are met. – Amit Erandole Nov 12 '12 at 19:02
    
What are the ranges like? Do they all increment in a consistent (or at least predictable) manner? If so, then it's just simple math to figure out what range they're in. – I Hate Lazy Nov 12 '12 at 19:02
    
they are non-consistent - dictated by management as per their market requirements – Amit Erandole Nov 12 '12 at 19:09
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use an array instead:

var CloudPlans = [
   {
        id: 'small',
        from: {
            cpu: 1,
            ram: 1
        },
        to: {
            cpu: 2,
            ram: 2
        },
        price: {
            linux: 3490,
            windows: 4190
        }
    },

    {
        id: 'medium',
        from: {
            cpu: 2,
            ram: 2
        },
        to: {
            cpu: 4,
            ram: 4
        },
        price: {
            linux: 5600,
            windows: 6300
        }
    },
    {
        id: 'large',
        from: {
            cpu: 4,
            ram: 4
        },
        to: {
            cpu: 6,
            ram: 8
        },
        price: {
            linux: 9500,
            windows: 10200
        }
    },
           //[...more configs here]
}

Now you can simply iterate over CloudPlans:

for(int planIdx = 0; planIdx < CloudPlans.length; ++planIdx) {
    var plan = CloudPlan[planIdx];
    if(cpuVal >= plan.from.cpu && cpuVal <= plan.to.cpu  || 
       ramVal >= plan.from.ram && ramVal <= plan.to.ram) {
           return plan.id;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this looks interesting. Could you please show me what the meat of the iteration function would look like? What would I do inside the iteration? – Amit Erandole Nov 12 '12 at 18:58
1  
@AmitErandole: of course, see my update. Not sure if the code is correct, but you should get the idea. BTW you have a C&P error in your original code, can you spot it now? – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Nov 12 '12 at 19:01
    
What is a 'C&P error'? Could you tell me? – Amit Erandole Nov 12 '12 at 19:06
    
Did you mean the comparisons? Yes I can see my error there – Amit Erandole Nov 12 '12 at 19:10
    
@AmitErandole "C & P error" is probably "copy-and-paste error" – alxndr Aug 18 '14 at 20:52

Well, coming back to this question, I thought I'd throw in my two cents...

I would compress your data storage a bit by using an Array so there's no more need for the min values.

var CloudPlans = [
   {    id: 'small',
        maxcpu: 2,
        maxram: 2,
        price: {
            linux: 3490,
            windows: 4190
        }
    }, {id: 'medium',
        maxcpu: 4,
        maxram: 4,
        price: {
            linux: 5600,
            windows: 6300
        }
    }, {id: 'large',
        maxcpu: 6,
        maxram: 8,
        price: {
            linux: 9500,
            windows: 10200
        }
    }, 
    // etc
].reverse(); // reverse it so the highest plan is first

Notice the .reverse(). We're going to compare from the highest down.


Then use a reduce function:

checkPlaninRange: function(cpuVal, ramVal) {
    return CloudPlans.reduce(function(plan, compare) {
        return cpuVal <= compare.maxcpu && 
               ramVal <= compare.maxram    ? compare : plan;
    }).id; // remove .id to return the entire object
}

Or if you want something a little more efficient, use a for loop in the same way:

checkPlaninRange: function(cpuVal, ramVal) {
    var plan = CloudPlans[0];
    for (var i = 1; i < CloudPlans.length; i++) {
        if (cpuVal <= CloudPlans[i].maxcpu && 
            ramVal <= CloudPlans[i].maxram    ) {
            plan = CloudPlans[i];
        } else break;
    }
    return plan.id; // remove .id to return the entire object
}

Not quite as clean, but it lets you break the loop early.


These are easy to extend with additional similar comparisons.

share|improve this answer

You can loop over the config with the given vals. Something like

var planFrom, planTo, cpuInRange, ramInRange;

for (var plan in CloudPlans) {
   planFrom = plan.from;
   planTo = plan.to;
   cpuInRange = cpuVal >= planFrom.cpu && cpuVal < planTo.cpu;  
   ramInRange = ramVal >= plamFrom.ram...; 
   if (cpuInRange || ramInRange) {
      return plan.id; 
   } 
}
share|improve this answer

You can make a more general function from this:

function check(plan, values) {
    for (var prop in values)
        if (plan.from[prop] <= values[prop] && plan.to[prop] >= values[prop])
             return true; // if only one property is met
    return false;
}
// yet I guess this is what you want:
function check(plan, values) {
    for (var prop in values)
        if (plan.from[prop] > values[prop] || plan.to[prop] < values[prop])
             return false; // if only one property is not met
    return true; // if all properties are met
}

Now your checkPlaninRange method could look like that:

checkSmallRange: function(cpuVal, ramVal) {
    if ( check(CloudPlan.small, {cpu:cpuVal, ram:ramVal}) )
        return "small";
}

Of course you also can loop your cloud plans with that:

getPossiblePlans: function(cpuVal, ramVal) {
    var plans = []
    for (var id in CloudPlans)
        if ( check(CloudPlans[id], {cpu:cpuVal, ram:ramVal}) )
            plans.push(id);
    return plans;
}

As @Tomasz Nurkiewicz mentioned, an array with a defined loop order would be better here. With CloudPlans being an object, the enumeration order is undefined (implementation-dependent) so it might return any plan when their ranges are not distinct.

share|improve this answer

One simple thing you could do is (dynamically, up front) create arrays whose values represent the respective ranges:

var cpu = ["small", "small", "medium", "medium", "medium", "large"];
var ram = ["small", "medium", "medium", "medium", "large"];

Which you'd use like this:

function checkPlaninRange(cpuVal, ramVal) {
    return cpu[Math.floor(cpuVal)] || "large";
}

checkPlaninRange(4.2); // "medium"
share|improve this answer
    
So, what happens if the small plan contains ram sizes up to 4.5 (MB)? – Bergi Nov 12 '12 at 19:18
    
@Bergi - What happens is that you'd use something else, probably. But if the sample code is representative, then this is fine. – Wayne Burkett Nov 12 '12 at 19:21
1  
Yes, this method does only work for finite, small, and discrete value ranges. It is not appropriate for the OP, his management could want to offer other plans tomorrow and he would not want to rewrite his code. – Bergi Nov 12 '12 at 19:29

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