Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to compile an input string (from a database) as a function and run it. This is the method I currently use:

Say I already have this function defined:

def foo():
    print "Yo foo! I am a function!"

And the string I read in from the data base says I should call this function:

string_from_db = "foo()"

I then form a function (whose name I can control) which returns the function I read in from the database:

my_func_string = "def doTheFunc():\n\t return " + string_from_db

Now I compile the string, and set it to a function name I use later for processing:

exec my_func_string
processor = doTheFunc

I can call it later by running processor() which exclaims: Yo foo! I am a function!

My Question: Above this piece of code there is a comment (left by a long lost developer):

    ###############################################################
    # The following method for getting a function out of the text #
    # in the database could potentially be replaced by using      #
    # Python's ast module to obtain an abstract syntax tree and   #
    # put it inside of a function node                            #
    ###############################################################

I'd like to know more about this "potential replacement." I have taken a look at AST, but I am very confused on how it can help me do what I am already doing with the code above.

  1. How can I accomplish the same thing using AST? Or where can AST help me in this process?
  2. Is the implementation using AST better, and why?
share|improve this question
4  
Ye be in the realms of dark magic. –  Jakob Bowyer Nov 12 '12 at 19:15
1  
If you know the strings to be safe, there's no reason to use ast over exec(). The Python interpreter already implements parsing Python source code into function objects, why replicate it? –  millimoose Nov 12 '12 at 19:32
    
@millimoose I ended up going with the exec implementation, as I know my strings are safe. However, this question has enlightened me on better uses for ast. Thanks! –  dinkelk Nov 12 '12 at 21:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

AST is a much safer choice when evaluating untrusted code, that could contain malicious instructions, eval or exec can execute any expression, while AST on the other hand, allows you to parse and validate the expression yourself, or execute a limited expression using ast.literal_eval, sort of like a sandbox, which allows only strings, lists, numbers and a few other things. This is just a simple example:

import ast
a = ast.literal_eval("[1,2,3,4]") //evaluate an expression safely.

Another example that parses a string into an AST:

import ast
source = '2 + 2'
node = ast.parse(source, mode='eval')
ast.dump(node)

This prints:

Expression(body=BinOp(left=Num(n=2), op=Add(), right=Num(n=2)))

There's a very good tutorial here and also the documentation

share|improve this answer
    
Great tutorial! How would I go about "validating an expression for myself"? How can I tell if code is bad, or doesn't meet my requirements? Assuming I am going to need to compile small functions; I cannot limit myself to simple strings, lists, etc. –  dinkelk Nov 12 '12 at 19:49
    
@babydanks you can find out if it calls any functions that it shouldn't, like open maybe. –  mux Nov 12 '12 at 20:05
    
Ah! At what level is this easiest to do? Once you have an ast function node? (ie. what would be the easiest way to check for open?) –  dinkelk Nov 12 '12 at 20:09
    
@babydanks there's a NodeVisitor class that you should probably have a look at, there's an example in the tutorial too. –  mux Nov 12 '12 at 20:19
    
@babydanks the point is, that it gives you more control over what gets executed and what not, than eval or exec if you need it. –  mux Nov 12 '12 at 20:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.