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I need a function template that accepts two iterators that could be pointers. If the two arguments are random_access iterators I want the return type to be an object of

std::iterator<random_access_iterator_tag, ...> type

else a

std::iterator<bidirectional_iterator_tag, ...> type.

I also want the code to refuse compilation if the arguments are neither a bidirectional iterator, nor a pointer. I cannot have dependency on third party libraries e.g. Boost

Could you help me with the signature of this function so that it accepts bidirectional iterators as well as pointers, but not say input_iterator, output_iterator, forward_iterators.

One partial solution I can think of is the following

template<class T>
T foo( T iter1, T iter2) {
  const T tmp1 = reverse_iterator<T>(iter1);
  const T tmp2 = reverse_iterator<T>(iter2);
  // do something
}

The idea is that if it is not bidirectional the compiler will not let me construct a reverse_iterator from it.

share|improve this question
1  
This might help you: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/iterator/iterator_tags – Paul Manta Nov 12 '12 at 19:37
    
@PaulManta yes it has to be based on iterator_tags, but i cannot seem to get a clean solution. – san Nov 12 '12 at 19:43
1  
Unfortunately, C++ meta-programming is rarely clean. Does your compiler support enable_if? – Paul Manta Nov 12 '12 at 19:49
    
@PaulManta yes you are right and I am very new to templates. I have to check. I am on gcc 4.5 but the code needs to be reasonably "portable" and C++-03 – san Nov 12 '12 at 19:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

a bit simpler than previous answer, no dependency on std::enable_if:

namespace detail
{
    template<class T>
    T do_foo(T iter1, T iter2, std::random_access_iterator_tag t)
    {
        cout << "do_foo random_access" << endl;
        return iter1;
    }
    template<class T>
    T do_foo(T iter1, T iter2, std::bidirectional_iterator_tag t)
    {
        cout << "do_foo bidirectional" << endl;
        return iter1;
    }

}
template<class T>
void foo(T iter1, T iter2)
{
    typename std::iterator_traits<T>::iterator_category t;
    detail::do_foo(iter1, iter2, t);
}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    std::vector<int> v;
    foo(v.begin(), v.end());
    std::list<int> l;
    foo(l.begin(), l.end());
    return 0;
}

The solution also supports other iterator_categories derived from std::random_access_iterator_tag or std::bidirectional_iterator_tag (should there be any), while std::same<> checks for strict category equality.

share|improve this answer

Here's an example with enable_if based on iterator tags. The substitution fails if the given T doesn't have a iterator_category typedef and so that overload isn't considered during overload resolution.

Since you can't use C++11, see the reference pages for enable_if and is_same to see how you can implement it by yourself.

#include <iterator>
#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <list>

template<typename T>
typename
std::enable_if<
    std::is_same<
        typename T::iterator_category,
        std::bidirectional_iterator_tag
    >::value,
    T
>::type
foo(T it)
{
    std::cout << "bidirectional\n";
    return it;
}

template<typename T>
typename
std::enable_if<
    std::is_same<
        typename T::iterator_category,
        std::random_access_iterator_tag
    >::value,
    T
>::type
foo(T it)
{
    std::cout << "random access\n";
    return it;
}

// specialization for pointers

template<typename T>
T* foo(T* it)
{
    std::cout << "pointer\n";
    return it;
}

int main()
{
    std::list<int>::iterator it1;
    std::vector<int>::iterator it2;
    int* it3;
    std::istream_iterator<int> it4;
    foo(it1);
    foo(it2);
    foo(it3);
    //foo(it4); // this one doesn't compile, it4 is an input iterator
}

Live example.

As per @JonathanWakely's comment, we can get rid of specialization for pointers if we use std::iterator_traits. The typename T::iterator_category part then becomes

typename std::iterator_traits<T>::iterator_category
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I will see if there is a quick way to roll my own enable_if. – san Nov 12 '12 at 20:46
    
Why not use std::iterator_traits<T>::iterator_category and get support for pointers for free? Iterators are not required to define a nested iterator_category, they could specialize iterator_traits instead. – Jonathan Wakely Nov 12 '12 at 22:41
    
@JonathanWakely I didn't know iterator_traits is specialized for pointers, nice. Added that to the answer. – jrok Nov 12 '12 at 22:56

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