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I have two files large_input and subset_input file and their contents could be

large_input

1
34
65
7643
hello
we

subset_input

65
we
hello
34

In this case sort command is not very helpful, otherwise sort | uniq on both files following by diff would had been very useful

Question In such scenarion where data can not be sorted(because of its contents), whats the best way to find out

large_input - subset_input which would be

1
7643
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Why doesn't sort | uniq work? I did precisely what you said and got this: 0a1 > 1 2a4 > 7643 as the diff. Maybe you want to try sort -g –  jman Nov 12 '12 at 19:52
    
Why isn't sort helpful? It will sort it in lexicographic order, but that shouldn't matter; the exact order shouldn't matter if you just want to do set difference, as long as it's consistent. –  Brian Campbell Nov 12 '12 at 19:53
    
sort -g did the trick, thank you @skjaidev. –  daydreamer Nov 12 '12 at 19:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
diff <(sort file1) <(sort file2) | sed '/^[0-9][0-9]*[acd][0-9]*/d;s/^[<>] //'

works for me,

output:

1
7643

Some shells don't support <(sort fileX), so you might have to presort file files in-place like sort -o file1 file1; sort file -o file2 file2; ....

The sed expressions remove the output from diff. To see what it is doing, first remove the sed completely, the add back 1 section (delimited by semicolon) at a time.

I hope this helps.

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This is wonderful @shellter –  daydreamer Nov 12 '12 at 20:27

This is exactly what comm is made for:

comm -23 <(sort large_input) <(sort subset_input)
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You could use sed to produce a sed script that does the job:

sed -e 's#^#/^#' -e 's#$#$/d#' subset_input > sed_script

Then applying this sed script to your large_input is easy:

sed -f sed_script large_input

If you have bash, it can be done without a temporary file:

sed -f <(sed -e 's#^#/^#' -e 's#$#$/d#' subset_input) large_input

This solution only applies to a subset_input of 'reasonable' size though.

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