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I have been trying to finish this code but I am stuck at creating a temporary buffer. I never learned this before but somehow I need to use it for my program.

From this website I think the best choice would be

char * func1() {
     char *buffer = (char *)malloc(1000);
     buffer[0] = '\0'; // Initialize buffer
     // Do processing to fill buffer
     return buffer;
}

The following is my code

 #include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define LUNCHES 5
#define ARRAY 2

int main(void)
{
    int x;
    struct Food
    {
        char *name;                                                            /* “name” attribute of food */
        int weight, calories;                                                  /* “weight” and “calories” attributes of food */
    }lunch[LUNCHES] = { [0] = {"apple", 4, 100}, [1] = {"salad", 2, 80} };

    for(x = ARRAY; x < LUNCHES; ++x)
    {
        char *buff = malloc(sizeof(lunch[x].name));

        printf("Please input \"food\", weight, calories: ");
        scanf("%s", buff);
        scanf("%d %d", &lunch[x].weight, &lunch[x].calories);
        printf("The %s weighs %doz. and contains %d calories.\n", lunch[x].name, lunch[x].weight, lunch[x].calories);


    }

    return 0;
}

Ok changed that. But now the output is

The NULL weighs and contains . why null?

Corrected

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define LUNCHES 5
#define ARRAY 2

int main(void)
{
    int x;
    struct Food
    {
        char *name;                                                            /* “name” attribute of food */
        int weight, calories;                                                  /* “weight” and “calories” attributes of food */
    }lunch[LUNCHES] = { [0] = {"apple", 4, 100}, [1] = {"salad", 2, 80} };

    for(x = ARRAY; x < LUNCHES; x++)
    {
        lunch[x].name = malloc(25 * sizeof(char));

        printf("Please input \"food\", weight, calories: ");
        scanf("%s", lunch[x].name);
        scanf("%d %d", &lunch[x].weight, &lunch[x].calories);
        printf("The %s weighs %doz. and contains %d calories.\n\n", lunch[x].name, lunch[x].weight, lunch[x].calories);

        free(lunch[x].name);

    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
No, that's not right, and you seriously need to look at that for loop again. – Kerrek SB Nov 12 '12 at 21:50
    
fixed it. removed the = – user1819358 Nov 12 '12 at 22:01
    
OK. You need to say lunch[x].name = malloc(952);, and then scanf("%951s", lunch[x].name). – Kerrek SB Nov 12 '12 at 22:16
    
Do I have to allocate memory size? Because I want the program to figure out how much to use. – user1819358 Nov 12 '12 at 22:20
    
And how is the program supposed to do that? – Kerrek SB Nov 12 '12 at 22:23
up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, it's for(x = ARRAY; x < LUNCHES; ++x) - note the < instead of <=, otherwise you'll overflow the array (the index is zero-based, it runs from 0 to LUNCHES-1).

As for the allocation:

  • you need to create buffer for every entry in the lunch[] array, hence in the for loop you need something like lunch[x].name = malloc(SIZE), where SIZE is a reasonable value - for the purpose of meal name ~80 characters would seem more than enough;
  • next you must to check, that the pointer assigned to lunch[x].name is not NULL, which would signal out of memory condition - otherwise you might happen to cause a segmentation fault by dereferencing it;
  • then you can use the pointer (to the newly allocated buffer) as the argument to scanf(), but remember to specify the maximum width (i.e. SIZE-1), so that you don't overrun into unallocated memory.

Remember to use free() on the pointers to allocated memory when you don't need the data any more or at the end of the program - while in your simple example it's technically not necessary, it could easily start a very bad habit.

share|improve this answer
    
I know about the free. I just didn't get to that point yet. Thanks – user1819358 Nov 12 '12 at 22:14
    
Isn't it possible to have the program figure out how much memory to use depending on the meal name string size? – user1819358 Nov 12 '12 at 22:21
    
Sure, if you know how many items you are going to use. But then the question is, why not to put the array into the struct directly, as in struct Food { char name[NAMELEN]; ... } – peterph Nov 12 '12 at 22:59

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