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I am trying to post this JSON data string to my php site:

{
    "tag":"login"
    "email":"email@email.com"
    "password":"P@ssw0rd"
}

this is my C# code that I have:

        HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
        client.BaseAddress = new Uri("http://localhost/login/");
        string link = "http://localhost/login/";

        UserCredentials cred = new UserCredentials(email.Text, pass.Password.ToString());
        var data = new Dictionary<string, List<UserCredentials>>();
        string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(data, Formatting.Indented);


        HttpResponseMessage re = await client.PostAsync(link, new StringContent(json));

User credentials class:

public class UserCredentials
{
    public UserCredentials(string user, string pass)
    {
        User = user;
        Pass = pass;
        Tag = "login";
    }

    internal string User;
    internal string Pass;
    internal string Tag;
}

in my php script :

<?php

if (isset($_POST['tag']) && $_POST['tag'] != '') {
  echo "got tags";
else 
  echo "didn't get anything";
?>

does anyone know how I am supposed to send the tags over the postasync method? I am getting 'didn't get anything' .. please help

share|improve this question
    
Have you looked at the json string in your client? What did Fiddler say was going over the wire? I assume you are not really going to send username and password plain text over the wire –  Adam Straughan Nov 12 '12 at 23:51
    
no this is just so I can get the core working and then I was going to work on the encryption' –  Andrew Butler Nov 13 '12 at 16:25

3 Answers 3

First, fix your UserCredentials class. Make your memebers public, not internal.

public class UserCredentials
{
    public UserCredentials(string user, string pass)
    {
        User = user;
        Pass = pass;
        Tag = "login";
    }

    public string User;
    public string Pass;
    public string Tag;
}

Second, serialize only your credentials.

UserCredentials cred = new UserCredentials(email.Text, pass.Password.ToString());
string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(cred, Formatting.Indented);
System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(json);

You will see in the Output window something like this:

{
  "User": "me@hotmail.com",
  "Pass": "ILoveToEatGrapes",
  "Tag": "login"
}

Third, replace StringContent with FormUrlEncodedContent

If you are using PHP $_POST, then you must send something like key1=value1&key2=value2 in your HTTP request. This is called x-www-form-urlencoded and HttpClient contains the right class for this: FormUrlEncodedContent.

FormUrlEncodedContent receives a dictionary of key/value pairs.

// Create the list of keys and values.
var data = new Dictionary<string, string>();
data["tag"] = json;

// Send my keys and values.
HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
string link = "http://localhost/login/";
HttpResponseMessage re = await client.PostAsync(link, new FormUrlEncodedContent(data));

This will be sent through the connection:

POST /login/ HTTP/1.1
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Host: localhost
Content-Length: 142
Expect: 100-continue
Connection: Keep-Alive

tag=%7B%0D%0A++%22User%22%3A+%22me%40hotmail.com%22%2C%0D%0A++%22Pass%22%3A+%22I
LoveToEatGrapes%22%2C%0D%0A++%22Tag%22%3A+%22login%22%0D%0A%7D

Fourth, use your data in PHP

As you see above, data is encoded with a lot of percent signs. PHP automatically decodes the data for you, so you do not need to worry about that.

To convert the credentials from json to an array, you may use json_decode

$cred = json_decode($_POST['tag']);
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for mentioning FormUrlEncodedContent, I've used StringContent and had lot of truble with it, but FormUrlEncodedContent works perfectly, it's highly recommended. –  Viktor Benei Nov 19 '12 at 11:31

Any reason why you're using the dictionary (well, you actually create it but don't fill it) instead of the object rightaway?

    UserCredentials cred = new UserCredentials(email.Text, pass.Password.ToString());
    string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(cred, Formatting.Indented);
share|improve this answer
    
the json wouldn't serialize correctly if i did that –  Andrew Butler Nov 13 '12 at 16:24
    
Didn't notice at first, but the members of you User Credentials are internal. Is it an option to make them public? –  Grimace of Despair Nov 13 '12 at 21:18

cred created, but not added to data will probably result in an empty set

UserCredentials cred = new UserCredentials(email.Text, pass.Password.ToString());
var data = new Dictionary<string, List<UserCredentials>>();
data["key"] = new List<UserCredentials>{cred};
string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(data, Formatting.Indented);
share|improve this answer
    
how would I add it to the data? –  Andrew Butler Nov 13 '12 at 16:25
    
updated post to show adding –  Adam Straughan Nov 13 '12 at 17:06

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