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I've created an svg file of a rudimentary pcb mounted transformer. Is there a better way to create the windings instead of having lots of lines like I have below:

<g id="primarywinding">
        <line id="winding0" style="fill:none;stroke:black;stroke-width:2" x1="60" y1="67" x2="350" y2="67" />
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 4)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 8)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 12)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 16)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 20)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 24)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 28)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 32)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 36)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 40)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 44)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 48)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 52)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 56)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 60)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 64)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 68)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 72)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 76)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 80)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 84)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 88)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 92)"/>
        <use xlink:href="#winding0" transform="translate(0, 96)"/>
</g>
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Does using JavaScript to clone them count? (Do you only use this SVG in a JS-enabled environment?) How about accumulating them in batches of 2/4/8/16 windings per use? –  Phrogz Nov 17 '12 at 15:51
    
I can't use JS to clone them unfortunately, I'm using this svg file in an application (www.fritzing.org) - not a web browser. –  Francois Herbert Nov 17 '12 at 20:18

1 Answer 1

Yes, just repeat the <line> tag rather than using use. You can either use transform as you are doing or just adjust the co-ordinates directly. It will be much faster on Firefox at least. You can use a CSS style for the fill, stroke etc and then give all the lines a class attribute.

Better still would be to use a path and use an l or L or for your data - h or H for the lines. There's some examples of paths here.

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Thanks, I was sort of hoping for a way to reduce the number of lines it takes to represent all the windings. The svg file is used in a electronic design software [link](www.fritzing.org) so speed isn't my issue, just ease of adding extra lines. –  Francois Herbert Nov 14 '12 at 0:13
1  
a path with with a d attribute containing h elements would seem most compact, no? –  Robert Longson Nov 14 '12 at 8:20
    
Hi Robert, perhaps you could give me an example? –  Francois Herbert Nov 17 '12 at 20:27
    
I've added a link to examples in the answer –  Robert Longson Nov 18 '12 at 22:13

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