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I didn't think there was a difference between an inputstream object read from a local file vs one from a network source (Amazon S3 in this case) so hopefully someone can enlighten me.

These programs were run on a VM running Centos 6.3. The test file in both cases are 10MB.

Local file code:

    InputStream is = new FileInputStream("/home/anyuser/test.jpg");

    int read = 0;
    int buf_size = 1024 * 1024 * 2;
    byte[] buf = new byte[buf_size];

    ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream(buf_size);

    long t3 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    int i = 0;
    while ((read = is.read(buf)) != -1) {
        baos.write(buf,0,read);
        System.out.println("reading for the " + i + "th time");
        i++;
    }
    long t4 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.println("Time to read = " + (t4-t3) + "ms");

The output of this code is this: it reads 5 times, which makes sense since the buffer size read in is 2MB and the file is 10MB.

reading for the 0th time
reading for the 1th time
reading for the 2th time
reading for the 3th time
reading for the 4th time
Time to read = 103ms

Now, we have the same code run with the same 10MB test file, except this time, the source is from Amazon S3. We don't start reading until we finish getting the stream from S3. However, this time, the read loop is running through thousands of times, when it should only read it 5 times.

    InputStream is;
    long t1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    is = getS3().getFileFromBucket(S3Path,input);
    long t2 = System.currentTimeMillis();

    System.out.print("Time to get file " + input + " from S3: ");
    System.out.println((t2-t1) + "ms");

    int read = 0;
    int buf_size = 1024*1024*2;
    byte[] buf = new byte[buf_size];

    ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream(buf_size);
    long t3 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    int i = 0;

    while ((read = is.read(buf)) != -1) {
        baos.write(buf,0,read);
        if ((i % 100) == 0)
        System.out.println("reading for the " + i + "th time");
        i++;
    }
    long t4 = System.currentTimeMillis();

    System.out.println("Time to read = " + (t4-t3) + "ms");

The output is as follows:

Time to get file test.jpg from S3: 2456ms
reading for the 0th time
reading for the 100th time
reading for the 200th time
reading for the 300th time
reading for the 400th time
reading for the 500th time
reading for the 600th time
reading for the 700th time
reading for the 800th time
reading for the 900th time
reading for the 1000th time
reading for the 1100th time
reading for the 1200th time
reading for the 1300th time
reading for the 1400th time
Time to read = 14471ms

The amount of time taken to read the stream changes from run to run. Sometimes it takes 60 seconds, sometimes 15 seconds. It doesn't get faster than 15 sec. The read loop still loops through 1400+ times on each test run of the program, even though I think it should only be 5 times, like the local file example.

Is this how inputstream works when the source is through the network, even though we had finished getting the file from the network source? Thanks in advance for your help.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't think it's specific to java. When you read from the network, the actual read call to the operating system will return a packet of data at a time, no matter how big is the buffer you allocated. If you check the size of the read data (your read variable), it should show the size of the network packet used.

This is one of the reason why people use a separate thread to read from network and avoid blocking by using async i/o technique.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your reply. so just because I write ... is = getFileFromS3(); .... doesn't mean that the file is downloaded to local memory for quick access? I guess I'm confused because I put some debug lines and it showed the amount of time to run the method to "download" the file from S3 was 2.5 sec. –  Classified Nov 13 '12 at 0:38
1  
@imel96: Is that true? Per documentation: Reads up to byte.length bytes of data from this input stream into an array of bytes. This method blocks until some input is available. Returns: the total number of bytes read into the buffer, or -1 if there is no more data because the end of the stream has been reached –  Yogendra Singh Nov 13 '12 at 0:46
2  
my answer still conforms to the documentation. The doc doesn't say that it will block until it's finished reading the stream, it only blocks until some input is available. The underlying recv(2) standard says for stream-based socket "data shall be returned to the user as soon as it becomes available, and no data shall be discarded". –  imel96 Nov 13 '12 at 2:02

As @imel96 points out, there is nothing in the documentation that guarantees the behaviour you are expecting. You will never read 2MB at a time from a socket, because the socket receive buffer isn't normally that large, quite apart from other factors such as bandwidth.

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Thx for your reply. So, what you guys are saying is even though the method has completed and returned an inputstream object to the variable "is" in line 3 of the second example, I'm still reading from a network socket and I don't have the inputstream "blob" locally to read/manipulate? –  Classified Nov 13 '12 at 7:42
1  
The inputstream object 'is' on that example is only a "file descriptor". It doesn't have any part of the file until you start reading from it. –  imel96 Nov 14 '12 at 1:07

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