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How can I rewrite this code in such a way that user is always shown the correct state(CA,AL etc.) string whenever he passes a valid direction.

i.e How do I make sure there is a valid case statement for each of those enum_types in the directions enum during compile time than in runtime?

For. Eg. I have intentionally commented out the case statement for east. Is there a way to catch this at compile time.

My gut feel is (NO) that this is why the language provides a default case and hence this may not be possible. But I'll leave this to the experts.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace::std;

typedef enum 
{
    min_dir = -1,
    north,
    south,
    east,
    west,
}directions;

directions get_direction( string user_choice)
{
    if(user_choice == "north")
    {
        return north;
    }
    else if (user_choice == "south")
    {
        return south;   
    }
    else if (user_choice == "east")
    {
        return east;    
    }
    else if (user_choice == "west")
    {
        return west;    
    }
    else 
    {
        return min_dir;
    }
}

int main()
{
    string user_direction;
    cout << "Enter direction\n";
    cin >> user_direction;

    directions my_dir = get_direction(user_direction);
    cout << " Print direction's description\n";

    if( my_dir == min_dir)
    {
        // User passed junk
        return -1;
    }

    switch(my_dir)
    {
    case north:
        cout << "North - New york\n";break;
    case south:
        cout << "South - Alabama\n";break;
//  case east:
//      cout << "East - North Carolina\n";break;
    case west:
        cout << "West - California\n";break;
    default:
        cout << "Should Ideally never get here\n";break;
    }
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

Edit: This is just an example to illustrate the point. This for code at work. They have compile this both in Windows(MSVC) and linux (gcc). Would this only be a warning? I'll need a stricter enforcement.

Can I write some code that will error out during a make process if an enum doesn't have a case statement?

share|improve this question
1  
What compiler are you using? –  Travis Gockel Nov 13 '12 at 1:50
2  
GCC, for example, offers an option -Wswitch-enum that will warn you if a case is missing (even if there is a default statement). –  jogojapan Nov 13 '12 at 1:52
3  
As a note: In C++, you can just say enum directions without that C-holdover typedefing. Also, system("pause") is considered "bad practice": gidnetwork.com/b-61.html –  Travis Gockel Nov 13 '12 at 2:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In GCC (g++) and Clang, there is -Wswitch-enum, which will warn you if you do not have a case for a possible value for the enum type you're switching over (even if you have a default case).

In MSVC, there is the comparable C4062 which comes from warning level 3, but it will not warn you if you have a default statement. If you want warnings in that case, you need to enable the level 4 warning C4061, which produces a warning when an enumerated value is missing, even if a default case is provided.

As far as making it an error goes: all compilers have a "treat warnings as errors" option. In GCC and Clang, it's -Werror; in MSVC, it's /WX.

share|improve this answer
    
What if I do not want to treat warnings as errors, since that would affect a lot of other warnings that we choose to live with. I am looking for ways, from a code restructure point of view that would error out. –  Kingkong Jnr Nov 13 '12 at 2:14
1  
GCC has errors for specific warnings: -Werror=switch-enum; in MSVC, it's /We: /We4062. –  Travis Gockel Nov 13 '12 at 2:20
    
"I am looking for ways, from a code restructure point of view that would error out." I'm not sure why you're looking for a way to change your code when the compiler already provides the tools to do what you're looking for with no changes to your code. –  Travis Gockel Nov 13 '12 at 2:44

If you use a an array of functors sized to your enum and initialized when declared then you can do a static_assert on the size of the array vs the enum count to verify all members are present. By using functors in the array rather than function pointers, you are also sure that you didn't supply an nullptr as values since each functor will be constructed.

typedef enum 
{
    min_dir = -1,
    north = 0,
    south,
    count_dir
}directions;

class GoDir
{
public:
    virtual void operator()() {}
};

class GoNorth : public GoDir
{
public:
    virtual void operator()() {}
};

class GoSouth : public GoDir
{
public:
    virtual void operator()() {}
};

static GoDir actions[count_dir] = {GoNorth(), GoSouth()};
static_assert(sizeof(actions)/sizeof(actions[0]) == count_dir, "Error");
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