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I usually use the switch statement when I have to write multiple condition statements, often where there are three or more well-defined conditions.

However, to handle a biconditional statement including a fall-through behavior, I am often hesitating between a simple if, else if, else statement and the switch statement :

if (condition1)
{
    // handling condition1.
}
else if (condition2)
{
    // handling condition2.
}
else 
{
    // handling fall-through.
}

or

switch (n)
{
    case condition1:
    // handling condition1.
    break;

    case condition2:
    // handling condition2.
    break;

    default:
    // handling fall-through.
    break;
}

The Wikipedia Switch statement article states :

In some languages and programming environments, the use of a case or switch statement is considered superior to an equivalent series of if-else statements because it is:

  • easier to debug (e.g. setting breakpoints on code vs. a call table, if the debugger has no conditional breakpoint capability)
  • easier to read (subjective)
  • easier to understand and therefore
  • easier to maintain
  • faster execution potential

About the .NET Common Language Runtime, is faster execution potential of a switch statement be realistic in this case ?

I am curious to know how the Common Language Runtime is handling both scenarios and how one would be preferable over the other.

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3  
Let me tell u that I think If is for "Condition" and Switch is for "Option". –  Bui Akinori Nov 13 '12 at 2:11
1  
I always find switch to be tidier and easier to read when you have more than one nesting, but it takes more space to write. The main thing is that when it comes to complex type checks, switch just won't work (unless you use .ToString()) and a series of ifs is the only alternative. –  yu_ominae Nov 13 '12 at 2:24
    
@BuiAkinori : I like your comment. You should have written that as an answer and I would have given you an upvote ! :-) –  user1706953 Nov 13 '12 at 13:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Faster execution potential means it tries to use binary search if possible (instead of linear search, in the if... else if... case).

However, if... else if... is generally more powerful, as it can do things that switch cannot do.

So I guess if all you need to do is to compare a string or an integer, use switch. It also help a little with readability.

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Very clear answer. Thanks. –  user1706953 Nov 13 '12 at 13:53

I think If is for "Condition" and Switch is for "Option"

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If you are thinking about compilation time purpose IF CONDITION is always preferable. If conditions do faster checking than switch case.

But if you thin programatically then If condition is just a series of boolean checks. For program to work efficiently switch case should be used(Although it consumes time).

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