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I've used this sort of thing countless times in Perl:

for ( $someVariable ) {
    s/findthis/replaceitwiththis/g;
    s/findthat/replaceitwithsomethingelse/g;
}

The value of $someVariable is temporarily in $_ and the variable is updated "in place"; each new substitution command continues to update/overwrite the variable's contents. It's a handy and compact way to get a lot of changes done in a simple loop.

Does Powershell have an equivalent of this use of "for"?

Adding comment following response from @neolisk, so that I can use formatting.

$s = 'abcde'
$s | foreach {
    $_ -replace 'a','x'
    $_ -replace 'e','z'
}
write-host "And: $s"

Result seen on-screen:

xbcde
abcdz
And: abcde

Also tried $_ = $_ -replace 'a','x' and so forth. There must be some additional syntax required here to get the "in-place" substitution...

Further edit following reply from @Nacht. This works, though I'm not crazy about the back-ticks:

$s = 'now is the time for all good individuals blah blah'
Write-Host $s
$s = $s `
  -replace "now", 'NEVER' `
  -replace 'time', 'moment' `
  -replace "blah\s+blah", '-- oh, WHATEVER'
Write-Host $s

Output:

now is the time for all good individuals blah blah
NEVER is the moment for all good individuals -- oh, WHATEVER
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3 Answers 3

It is exactly like this in Powershell, but the syntax is slightly different:

$someVariable | foreach {
    Write-Host $_;
}

If you want to do in-place replace, keep in mind that $_ is immutable, i.e. readonly. The proper way would be to output new string on pipeline and collect into another variable, so for your example it can look like this:

$s = 'abcde' 
$newS = $s | foreach {
    $_ -replace 'a','x' -replace 'e','z'    
}
write-host "And: $newS";
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(Added comment in the main body of the question as comment box doesn't seem to support full text formatting. Hope that isn't a case of 'don't do that on StackOverflow'. –  marst12017 Nov 13 '12 at 3:56
    
@marst12017: please see my edit. –  Neolisk Nov 13 '12 at 14:12

is this what you're looking for?

$s = 'abcde'
$s = $s -replace 'a','x' -replace 'e','z'
write-host "And: $s"

output:

And: xbcdz

you could also do it on several lines like this:

$s = 'abcde'
$s = $s -replace 'a','x'
$s = $s -replace 'e','z'
write-host "And: $s"

the following doesn't work because each line is outputed separately:

$s | foreach {
    $_ -replace 'a','x'
    $_ -replace 'e','z'
}

the following doesn't work because assignment statements don't output anything:

$s | foreach {
    $_ = $_ -replace 'a','x'
}
share|improve this answer
    
The goal is to have the variable's value updated "in place". Hoped-for result: And: xbcdz –  marst12017 Nov 13 '12 at 4:01
    
edit should give you the solution you want - i simply added $s = to the beginning of the foreach –  Nacht Nov 13 '12 at 4:04
    
Or perhaps there's no need for foreach. Perhaps this is good enough: $s = $s -replace 'a','x' -replace 'e','z'. A vague imitation of a loop can be created by adding line breaks and using back-ticks in the appropriate places. The back-ticks make it look a bit klutzy but the line breaks make it a bit easier to read. Still I don't know if it's considered the right way to do it in Powershell. –  marst12017 Nov 13 '12 at 4:17
    
ha oh right of course - you can simply do $s = $s -replace 'a','x' -replace 'e','z' –  Nacht Nov 13 '12 at 4:24
    
you may want to do each -replace on a separate line. most string operations do not require using foreach to get each individual chraacter in powershell - usually they can be dealt with using the functions/methods/operators available –  Nacht Nov 13 '12 at 4:28

I don't know if it's appropriate here to answer my own question in this way. If not, please advise. To sum up several approaches (all checked):

$s = 'abcde' (likewise for all below)
$s | foreach {
    $_ `
    -replace 'a', 'X' `
    -replace 'e', 'Z'
}

Displays XbcdZ during execution. $s unchanged.

$s = $s `
    -replace 'a', 'X' `
    -replace 'e', 'Z'

$s is updated "in place"; value is now XbcdZ

$t = $s | foreach {
    $_ `
    -replace 'a', 'X' `
    -replace 'e', 'Z'
}

$s unchanged. Value of $t: XbcdZ

$t = $s `
  -replace 'a', 'X' `
  -replace 'e', 'Z'

$s unchanged. Value of $t: XbcdZ

($t = $s) `
  -replace 'a', 'X' `
  -replace 'e', 'Z'
Write-Host "`$s: $s -- `$t: $t"

Added the parens to see what might happen.
Neither variable's value changes. XbcdZ is printed to the console above the line printed via Write-Host.

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