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I'm kind of confused about how to implement synchronized blocks in Java.

Here is an example situation:

public class SlotWheel extends Thread implements ActionListener
{
  private int currentTick; // This instance variable is modified in two places

  private synchronized void resetCurrentTicks()
  {
    currentTick = 0;
  }

  private synchronized void incrementCurrentTicks()
  {
    ++currentTick;
  }

  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
  {
    resetCurrentTicks();
  }
}

While the program is running, it's possible that a user clicks a button which invokes actionPerformed which then calls resetCurrentTicks. At the same time, the running thread is calling incrementCurrentTicks on each loop iteration.

Because I'm still new to Java and programming, I'm not sure if my implementation is protecting currentTick from becoming corrupted.

I have this feeling that my implementation would only work if incrementCurrentTicks were to be called in actionPerformed and in the running thread, but because I'm manipulating currentTick from different methods, my implementation is wrong.

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Your code appears correct to me. Setting currentTick to zero cannot occur between fetching the value and setting it for the ++ operator, since both are in synchronized methods. –  Hot Licks Nov 13 '12 at 4:09
    
For future reference, the "homework" tag shouldn't be used on new questions and is being phased out of the old ones... –  HostileFork Nov 13 '12 at 4:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Looks ok.

See http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/syncmeth.html

It is not possible for two invocations of synchronized methods on the same object to interleave

Of course you should consider whether it is the GUI thread trying to mess with the ticks or not. In your simple case it's probably ok, but in a more complex case you might want to push the "work" out of the GUI thread.

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Thanks! I was trying to find something on docs.oracle.com stating exactly what was in the link you posted. –  user1114264 Nov 13 '12 at 3:51

Your instincts are correct. It is difficult to synchronize access to class properties consistently across multiple methods. Rather than attempting to do so, I would recommend you take a look at java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger. It provides you with safe, concurrent access to the underlying property without writing and testing alot of boilerplate code.

Incorporating it into your code, you would end up with something like this:

public class SlotWheel extends Thread implements ActionListener {
  private AtomicInteger currentTick = new AtomicInteger();

  private void resetCurrentTicks() {
    currentTick.set(0);
  }

  private void incrementCurrentTicks() {
    currentTick.incrementAndGet();
  }

  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
  {
    resetCurrentTicks();
  }
}
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If you look at John3136's link, it says "it is not possible for two invocations of synchronized methods on the same object to interleave." Does that mean it's safe? –  user1114264 Nov 13 '12 at 3:59
    
Synchronized methods acquire the instance lock, so access to them from several concurrent threads is pretty much guaranteed to be safe. However, as you can see from your example, you would need to remember to add the synchronize keyword to all methods that can mutate the shared state. Locking on the object instance can also reduce runtime performance of your code. –  Perception Nov 13 '12 at 4:08

First off, Java guarantees that "scalar" values -- integers, chars, floats, etc -- are atomic in themselves in that you cannot simultaneously modify such a value and get a mixture of the two sources. You're guaranteed to get one value or the other of two "simultaneous" modifications. You can, however, get an inconsistent result from, eg, x++, since two threads may attempt to simultaneously increment x and possibly only one increment might occur. (OTOH, two threads simultaneously performing x = 7; will obviously not interfere with each other -- simultaneous access does not cause an explosion or anything.)

Next, understand that the synchronized keyword is used in two slightly different contexts -- as a method modifier and as a block modifier. There is some modest difference between the two.

When used as a block modifier you say synchronized(object_ref) {some block}. In this case the synchronized statement gets a lock on the object identified by object_ref and all other syncronized statements that might simultaneously attempt to execute referencing the same object will be held off while the current statement finishes its block.

When you use it as a method modifier, the function is the same except that, for a non-static method, the "this" object is the one that is locked, and the entire method is is "protected" by the lock.

(For a static method, on the other hand, the Class object is locked -- a slightly special case, equivalent to synchronized(ClassName.class){some block} as a synchronized block.)

It's important to understand that for two synchronized blocks or methods to be prevented from simultaneously executing they must be referencing, as their synchronizing object, the same object, not simply one of the same class.

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Thanks for that explanation! –  user1114264 Nov 13 '12 at 4:10

You are correct, in that it is not safe. However, you can simply synchronize on any Object in scope, and remove "synchronized" from the method definition

public class MyThread {
  private Object lock = new Object();
  private int counter;

  protected void threadMetod() {
    synchronized (lock) {
      counter++;
    }
  }

  public void otherReset() {
    synchronized (lock) {
      counter = 0;
    }
  }
}
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Is the lock object necessary, or could I simply use synchronized(this) { ... } –  user1114264 Nov 13 '12 at 3:56
    
According to John3136's reference link, my code is safe. Am I misunderstanding the comment "it is not possible for two invocations of synchronized methods on the same object to interleave" –  user1114264 Nov 13 '12 at 3:58
    
There's no difference between using your synchronized blocks and the OP's synchronized methods. –  Hot Licks Nov 13 '12 at 4:07
    
Since the synchronized modifiers on instance methods reference "this" then the code is already safe. My personal preference is to use synchronized blocks, semantically speaking it is more readable. It is also more granular if only parts of a method must abide by the synchronization logic, which should always be kept to a minimum –  Alex Nov 13 '12 at 4:07
    
But the OP's code is safe as written. –  Hot Licks Nov 13 '12 at 4:11

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