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I am trying to use groovy for xml processing and still finding it difficult to understand its behavior. Can someone explain to me why the following program spits out 1 and 0 please? I am expecting 0 in both cases as the 'onenode' element has no children...what am I missing here?

def text = """
 <characters>
   <props>
      <prop>dd</prop>
   </props>
   <character id="1" name="Wallace">
       <likes>cheese</likes>
   </character>
   <character id="2" name="Gromit">
       <likes>sleep</likes>
   </character>
   <onenode>help</onenode>
</characters>
"""

def xmlp = new XmlParser().parseText(text)
println xmlp.onenode[0].children().size() // prints out 1

def xmls = new XmlSlurper().parseText(text)
println xmls.onenode[0].children().size() // prints out 0
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1 Answer 1

The difference is the way the parsed tree is built (both in the classes used, and how the methods work).

If we write a closure to interrogate the tree:

def dumpTypeTree = { node, prefix = '' ->
  def name  = node.respondsTo( 'name' ) ? "${node.name()} -- " : ''
  def clazz = node.getClass().name
  def txt   = node.respondsTo('text') ? node.text() : node
  println "${prefix}${name}${clazz} '${txt}'"
  if( node.respondsTo( 'children' ) ) {
    node.children().each { child ->
      owner.call( child, "$prefix  " )
    }
  }
}

When we call this method with the XmlParser constructed tree:

dumpTypeTree( new XmlParser().parseText(text) )

we get:

characters -- groovy.util.Node ''
  props -- groovy.util.Node ''
    prop -- groovy.util.Node 'dd'
      java.lang.String 'dd'
  character -- groovy.util.Node ''
    likes -- groovy.util.Node 'cheese'
      java.lang.String 'cheese'
  character -- groovy.util.Node ''
    likes -- groovy.util.Node 'sleep'
      java.lang.String 'sleep'
  onenode -- groovy.util.Node 'help'
    java.lang.String 'help'

As you can see, the onenode node contains a String which is the text contents of that Node. And the text() call returns what we would expect.

However, calling it with XmlSlurper:

dumpTypeTree( new XmlSlurper().parseText(text) )

gives us:

characters -- groovy.util.slurpersupport.NodeChild 'ddcheesesleephelp'
  props -- groovy.util.slurpersupport.NodeChild 'dd'
    prop -- groovy.util.slurpersupport.NodeChild 'dd'
  character -- groovy.util.slurpersupport.NodeChild 'cheese'
    likes -- groovy.util.slurpersupport.NodeChild 'cheese'
  character -- groovy.util.slurpersupport.NodeChild 'sleep'
    likes -- groovy.util.slurpersupport.NodeChild 'sleep'
  onenode -- groovy.util.slurpersupport.NodeChild 'help'

As you can see, there are no String children, and only calling text() on leaf nodes would make any sense, as outside the leaves, we get all of the text concatenated together.

Anyway, hope this explains the difference in number of children

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tim. That explains a lot to me. –  user1819873 Nov 13 '12 at 17:39

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