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How can I initialize a static object in c++? I'm looking for something like static block in java.

I tried this:

Foo.hpp

class Foo{
    public:
    static Bar b;
    static String s;
    static Bar setB();
};

Foo.cpp

Bar Foo::b = Foo::setB();
String Foo::s = "something";
Bar Foo::setB()
{
    Bar bb;
    bb.use(s);
    return bb;
}

There is no compile error, but it's not working.

Many thanks

share|improve this question
1  
I do not know why it's not working, because it should :) – dasblinkenlight Nov 13 '12 at 4:22
    
Thank you guys, you are right, I should have posted the actual code (It was complicated with long names, just didn't want to mess the question). It works. The problem was that I was using another static variable in the setB function which was initialized after b. – user1819676 Nov 14 '12 at 0:48

Your code:

class Foo{
    public:
    static Bar b;
    static Bar setB();
}

Your comment:

There is no compile error

That is not correct. It can not compile, due to missing semicolon.

When that is pointed out, most SO posters then claim in some comment that "but it's just a typing mistake, I will correct it", thus compounding the error by invalidating already posted answers.

In short, when you post code, do copy and paste the real code. Don't retype it. Copy and paste.

Now, to the core question, the continuation of the above comment, that

it's not working.

Well, assuming that your real code has the appropriate semicolons, and that Bar is defined, etc., then also that part is just plain wrong.

I tested it with Visual C++ and MingW g++, and (when corrected for semicolons etc.) it works just OK.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, I should have posted the actual code. Now I've edited the post, though I found the problem, and post it as a comment. Thanks – user1819676 Nov 14 '12 at 0:54

Bar needs a no-args constructor so that it can initialize itself to the expected value.

No need for Foo::setBar() since Foo will already have the Bar instance.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried to simplify the code. The Bar b was actually a list, which some strings should be inserted to it. So I need the setBar(). I edited the post, though found the problem. – user1819676 Nov 14 '12 at 0:58

Your example works, other than the fact that you didn't actually initialize anything:

#include <iostream>

class Foo{
public:
    static int b;
    static int setB();
};

int Foo::b = Foo::setB();
int Foo::setB()
{
    int bb;
    bb = 42;  // Not in your example
    return bb;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << 42 << std::endl;
}

This prints 42. (Note that I've changed "Bar" to "int" since you didn't post a definition of Bar.)

share|improve this answer
3  
I hope it prints 42, because 42 is explicitly printed :-) – JaredC Nov 13 '12 at 4:33

root cause : no semicolon at the end of the class definition. Works perfectly when I put one.

suggestions: Please give more code(the whole if possible) whenever you ask questions and please don't type the code again instead just copy paste it.

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