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I am about enjoy a two week break in Spain where I expect to have lots of time for relaxing and reading.

I normally read a lot of non-fiction so I'm looking for novel suggestions.

If there is another Cryptonomicon out there I'd love to hear about it!

UPDATE: In the end I took four books including Quicksilver. Quicksilver was fantastic and I look forward to continuing the series. I was disappointed with Gen X (Coupland) and Pattern Recognition (Gibson). Thanks for all the recommendations, I'm sure to return to this list when I have more free time.

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93 Answers 93

up vote 77 down vote accepted

William Gibson's Neuromancer comes to mind, although I liked Cryptonomicon better.

Neuromancer

Stephenson's own Baroque Cycle trilogy and Snow Crash are all outstanding.

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You mean just reading a Neal Stephenson book alone doesn't count as research?? :-) –  Jonathan Webb Sep 25 '08 at 15:27

For the sake of completeness, Neal Stephenson's The Diamond Age: Or, a Young Lady's Illustrated Primer.

Wherein a young lady receives an AI book which is programmed to educate her and give her the proper tools in life.

SPOILER: She learns programming via her avatar in the book, who learns how to program Turing machines!

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I'm surprised no-one's mentioned Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars Trilogy yet. The first one is called Red Mars and is followed by Blue Mars then Green Mars. You can probably guess the general theme. They're all fairly lengthy - just one of them would keep you busy a while.

I suppose you'd call it 'future history' as they give a pretty comprehensive view of what the colonisation of Mars might be like in the near future. It's fiction with quite a bit of politics, sociology, geography, technology and geology thrown in. Epic!

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Brave new World.
You are a Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta... or Epsilon?

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the Millenium trilogy by Stieg Larsson:

Almost pulp, but oh so entertaining. And a hacker that kicks ass.

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The Code Book by Simon Singh(a light history of crpytography/cryptanalysis) is the only non-fiction book I couldn't put down. I think I inhaled it in less than a day.

I'm currently reading Charles Stross' Accelerando and it's fun in a computer-geek way. The first several chapters are a constant barrage of "what-ifs" that come from extrapolating current tech (and tech policy) to near-ludicrous extremes.

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Microserfs by Douglas Coupland.

Good reminder that, at the end of the day, programming is just a job and you need to make the most of the rest of your life too.

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Great book. Jpod is another more recent by Coupland but it was just ok whereas I really enjoyed Microserfs. –  Alex Miller Sep 25 '08 at 14:25
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I didn't really care for Microserfs. If you live and work in the US it might be able to relate to it a little more than I did. –  cam8001 Sep 30 '08 at 0:38
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I read Microserfs when I was ~14 and adored it, it was the first thing that made me consider programming as a career. –  therefromhere Aug 12 '09 at 7:18

Although it's more of a non-fiction than a fiction Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid from Douglas Hofstadter is a good book to get.

GEB cover

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River of Gods - by Ian McDonald

Depicts a 21st century India where Artificial intelligences take the roles of common gods. not much programming in the book, but the author is definitely intelligent and keyed into the nuances of a programmer's interests.

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Not strictly "programming", but Daemon by Daniel Suarez (sometimes listed under the pseudonym Leinad Zeraus) is a pretty good read. ...and, of course, anything by William Gibson is usually a good choice.

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Logicomix: An Epic Search for Truth (Apostolos Doxiadis, Christos Papadimitriou)

http://www.logicomix.com/en/

A graphic novel based on the life of logician and philosopher Bertrand Russell. Great artwork, great story and I really liked their narrative style.

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I like the Dune Saga very much (the books by Frank Herbert). Although it is kind of hard to begin with. Beginning with second or third book I'd say it is really good.

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Catch 22 - Joseph Heller - One of my favourite books I have ever read. It will ring true with any one who has been part of large organization. This book is both very funny and tragic.
1984 - George Orwell - I was hesitant to read this but glad I finally did.
Brave New World & Brave New World Revisted & The Island - Aldous Huxley - BNW revisited is a series of essays about the topics in BNW(slightly dated but cool).
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger- Awesome
Ham on Rye - Charles Bukowski - For the more brave. Beowulf - Cool fable.
robot series(Caves of Steel) or Foundation - Isaac Asimov
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky - Kind of a hard read but I found it amazing.

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I thoroughly enjoyed Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson. It chronicles the terraforming and settling of Mars. For some reason I think of it as a programming novel, maybe because solving the problem of settling Mars reminds me of solving some difficult programming problems.

Edit: Whoops, someone already posted this.

alt text

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Since JPod is spoken for (and rightly so), I enjoyed Headcrash.

Neither JPod nor Headcrash is the second coming of Cryptonomicon, but they're both fun reads.

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The Ultimate Rush by Joe Quirk.

Bomb deactivator. Crack dealer. SWAT rifleman. My job will kill you faster than any of these. And it won't just kill you; it'll crush you to a pulpy clot on the streets of San Francisco.

Read the rest of Chapter 1 online.

cover art

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The Commodore C64 user manual.

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LOL! I still have this somewhere!! In Spanish! –  Mauricio Scheffer Feb 6 '09 at 14:22

jPOD by Douglas Coupland - the trials and tribulations of life in a dead end games programming team. Very funny, an easy read, and lots of programming, tech, web references.

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Mr Bunny's Guide to ActiveX.

The funniest coding book ever written. Also

Mr Bunny's Big Cup O'Java

Not quite so funny.

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Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein is not about programming but it might help you to grok grok.

Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! and What Do You Care What Other People Think? by Richard Feynman also not exactly programming related but a lot of interresting problem solving and that never hurts.

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I'd recommend Prey by Michael Crichton. It's about a nanobots escaping a lab and becoming a threat to our species.

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Some great suggestions in these 3 pages of answers but no-one's mentioned Theodore Sturgeon yet!

2 I'd recommend for programmers:

More than Human - this was the book that blew me away and made me a Sturgeon fan. Thinking back on it now, it may have effected how I ended up understanding OOP.

The Cosmic Rape - The copy I read was titled To Marry Medusa under which it was also released as a shorter version. It is a brilliant speculation on the idea of the hive mind.

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I'm surprised there's been no mention yet of any of Terry Pratchett's books. Any of his Discworld titles are well appreciated by the other devs I work with. They're a good, fun read and easy to get through after your brain has turned to putty after a tough day at the office.

Try The Colour of Magic or Mort for starters.

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See if you can run down "The Adolescence of P1," by Thomas J. Ryan:

Holds up extremely well, especially considering it was written in 1977.

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I don't know that it's 'the best' book, but an entertaining read (if not without problems) is "Takedown: The Pursuit and Capture of Kevin Mitnick, America's Most Wanted Computer Outlaw-By the Man Who Did It"

A lot of people who care a lot have complained about this book, but if you're just looking for a light read, it's quite enjoyable (if a bit old).

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The Atrocity Archive and The Jennifer Morgue, both by Charles Stross. Maybe more sysadmin than programming, but definitely worth reading - biting satire. Saving the world involves a surprising amount of meetings.

Not programming related, but also recommended - the Merchant Princes series, also by Charles Stross.

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Big If, by Mark Costello.

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