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I am about enjoy a two week break in Spain where I expect to have lots of time for relaxing and reading.

I normally read a lot of non-fiction so I'm looking for novel suggestions.

If there is another Cryptonomicon out there I'd love to hear about it!

UPDATE: In the end I took four books including Quicksilver. Quicksilver was fantastic and I look forward to continuing the series. I was disappointed with Gen X (Coupland) and Pattern Recognition (Gibson). Thanks for all the recommendations, I'm sure to return to this list when I have more free time.

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93 Answers 93

Coding Slave....by Bob Reselman.

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Max Barry writes very funny novels. Not strictly computer related, but "Company" was about being a drone inside a large corporation.

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Personally, I spent my holiday reading no programming books - as much as I love my job, it is a holiday remember! If you want to look at it as a learning experience, allowing yourself to explore other classics (maybe more Kafka than Austen if you like) bends your brain in a different way so you can come back with a different perspective on things. Zen and the Art of Motorcycle maintenance gets kind of close...

... code complete would have taken me over the luggage limit !

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i can't believe that no one has mentioned Jason K Chapman's The Heretic i must be getting old or something

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On another thread, someone recommended The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett. I'm now halfway through it and it's pretty good. So far, the advertised similarity of cathedral-building to software-building is only vaguely apparent, but that doesn't stop it being a very enjoyable novel.

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Chasm City by Alastair Reynolds.

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I liked Arthur C. Clarke's Rama series, though it's not nearly as dense as some others listed here. I'm going to check out Stephenson's Anathem (which was recommended above) as I've heard good things about it. Good thing I'm going on holiday in Canada next week!

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i've always liked "ME" by Thomas T. Thomas:

ME by Thomas T. Thomas

it reminds me very much of "The Adolescence of P1".

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Cubicle Farm Fantasy: An Indian IT worker's dream about escaping the rat race

This book was written by a good friend and mentor of mine at the first company I worked for. It is really funny to think of him as the main character of this book.

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There is a lucid narration by 'Simon Singh' about fermat's last theorem. He narrates about the various contributions that have finally led to the solution and they themselves are worth every penny. Thanks for the interesting post by the way.

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JPod - for voting purposes since I haven't seen it listed on its own in the answers yet. I liked it better than Microserfs.

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  1. Soul of A New Machine -- Tracey Kidder

  2. Showstopper -- G. Pascal Zachary.

  3. Boo Hoo -- Ernst Malmsted.

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+1 for Snow Crash. It's tightly packed, intense, for me the best new book in the recent years - including any non-sci fi

His Baroque cycle though, not so much. To much meandering, to inconclusive, incoherent. It does have goodness, but not everyone is willing to put up with the packaging. It's very polarizing for Stephenson fans: you might love it, or it might bore you stiff and stinky.

Microserfs by Douglas Coupland. Interesting is to see which things have changed, and which didn't.

Not strictly programming, but in a similar cloud: Spin by Robert Wilson. Very bold setup, excellently executed and - against my expectations - the resolution doesn't fall short. The followup, Axis is good but can't compete.

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Mr Bunny's Guide to ActiveX.

The funniest coding book ever written. Also

Mr Bunny's Big Cup O'Java

Not quite so funny.

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The Commodore C64 user manual.

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1  
LOL! I still have this somewhere!! In Spanish! –  Mauricio Scheffer Feb 6 '09 at 14:22

Catch 22 - Joseph Heller - One of my favourite books I have ever read. It will ring true with any one who has been part of large organization. This book is both very funny and tragic.
1984 - George Orwell - I was hesitant to read this but glad I finally did.
Brave New World & Brave New World Revisted & The Island - Aldous Huxley - BNW revisited is a series of essays about the topics in BNW(slightly dated but cool).
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger- Awesome
Ham on Rye - Charles Bukowski - For the more brave. Beowulf - Cool fable.
robot series(Caves of Steel) or Foundation - Isaac Asimov
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky - Kind of a hard read but I found it amazing.

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Logicomix: An Epic Search for Truth (Apostolos Doxiadis, Christos Papadimitriou)

http://www.logicomix.com/en/

A graphic novel based on the life of logician and philosopher Bertrand Russell. Great artwork, great story and I really liked their narrative style.

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River of Gods - by Ian McDonald

Depicts a 21st century India where Artificial intelligences take the roles of common gods. not much programming in the book, but the author is definitely intelligent and keyed into the nuances of a programmer's interests.

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There's Dan Brown's Digital Fortress but I've heard it's not very good.

Update: See comments.

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I've read it, its not completely terrible, but its nothing compared to Cryptonomicon. –  Brian Ensink Sep 25 '08 at 14:18
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Don't waste your time. –  Alex Miller Sep 25 '08 at 14:24
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Leave it as a warning to others. –  Bill the Lizard Sep 25 '08 at 15:02

For those that can read spanish and manage to grab a hold of a quite unknown novel:

No he venido aquí a hacer amigos from Jaime Miranda.

The author is a consultant and programmer, and the novel is a hilarious road novel with the main character traveling with the corpse of his manager in search of a witch to resurrect him. It does have quite a strong criticism against how managers deal with programmers and viceversa

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Big If, by Mark Costello.

alt text

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The Atrocity Archive and The Jennifer Morgue, both by Charles Stross. Maybe more sysadmin than programming, but definitely worth reading - biting satire. Saving the world involves a surprising amount of meetings.

Not programming related, but also recommended - the Merchant Princes series, also by Charles Stross.

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I don't know that it's 'the best' book, but an entertaining read (if not without problems) is "Takedown: The Pursuit and Capture of Kevin Mitnick, America's Most Wanted Computer Outlaw-By the Man Who Did It"

A lot of people who care a lot have complained about this book, but if you're just looking for a light read, it's quite enjoyable (if a bit old).

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Some great suggestions in these 3 pages of answers but no-one's mentioned Theodore Sturgeon yet!

2 I'd recommend for programmers:

More than Human - this was the book that blew me away and made me a Sturgeon fan. Thinking back on it now, it may have effected how I ended up understanding OOP.

The Cosmic Rape - The copy I read was titled To Marry Medusa under which it was also released as a shorter version. It is a brilliant speculation on the idea of the hive mind.

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I'd recommend Prey by Michael Crichton. It's about a nanobots escaping a lab and becoming a threat to our species.

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jPOD by Douglas Coupland - the trials and tribulations of life in a dead end games programming team. Very funny, an easy read, and lots of programming, tech, web references.

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The Ultimate Rush by Joe Quirk.

Bomb deactivator. Crack dealer. SWAT rifleman. My job will kill you faster than any of these. And it won't just kill you; it'll crush you to a pulpy clot on the streets of San Francisco.

Read the rest of Chapter 1 online.

cover art

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Since JPod is spoken for (and rightly so), I enjoyed Headcrash.

Neither JPod nor Headcrash is the second coming of Cryptonomicon, but they're both fun reads.

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