Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

enter image description here

i thought short is 1? why did it increase by 8, from 16 to 24?

share|improve this question
    
alignment on word boundary –  Mitch Wheat Nov 13 '12 at 5:15
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is a question of data type alignment.

Can someone explain to me why the offset is 0, 4, 8 16 and 24?

The first item is always going to be at the beginning of the structure (offset 0).

The char takes up one byte, so the next offset would be 1. However, the double* is 4-byte aligned (for performance), so it goes to the next 4-byte offset, 4. On x86 (32-bit) a pointer is 4 bytes, so the next offset is 8, where i goes.

I know the byte size for double is 8 and int is 4, but i thought short is 1? why did it increase by 8, from 16 to 24?

share|improve this answer
    
what about the short? –  Jenny C Nov 13 '12 at 5:25
    
You have no way to know how big the short is, because you can only tell by looking at the alignment of the field after it. There is no field after the short. The reason the offset of short s is 24, 8 larger than the offset of double d, is because the double is 8 bytes. –  librik Nov 13 '12 at 5:36
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.