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My problem is that my perspective projection doing the opposite what it is supposed to do. Instead of "shrinking" my object into the distant it is expanding it:

The white part is the closest triangles. I think you understand.

I'm creating my own perspective projection which I send to my vertexshader. I'm using the following opengl states:

gl.glEnable(GL2ES2.GL_DEPTH_TEST);
gl.glDepthFunc(GL2ES2.GL_LEQUAL);

gl.glEnable(GL2ES2.GL_CULL_FACE);
gl.glCullFace(GL2ES2.GL_BACK);
gl.glFrontFace(GL2ES2.GL_CW);

I'm using the follwoing code for the perspectiveMatrix part:

eye = {0,0,5};
viewMatrix = Calc.translate(identity_matrix, -eye[0], -eye[1], -eye[2]);
perspectiveMatrix = Calc.buildPerspProjMat(90, 1, 0.5f, 10);
model_view_projection = Calc.multiply(perspectiveMatrix, viewMatrix);

Where Calc.java have these functions:

public static float[] translate(float[] m,float x,float y,float z){
    float[] t = { 1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, x,
                  0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, y,
                  0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, z,
                     0,    0,    0, 1.0f };      
    return multiply(t, m);
}

public static float[] buildPerspProjMat(float fov, float aspect, float znear, float zfar) {
    float[] m = new float[16];
    float ymax = (float) (znear * Math.tan(Math.toRadians(fov/2)));
    float ymin = -ymax;
    float xmax = ymax * aspect;
    float xmin = ymin * aspect;

    float width = xmax - xmin;
    float height = ymax - ymin;

    float depth = zfar - znear;
    float q = -(zfar + znear) / depth;
    float qn = -2 * (zfar * znear) / depth;

    float w = 2 * znear / width;
    w = w / aspect;
    float h = 2 * znear / height;

    m[0]  = w;
    m[1]  = 0;
    m[2]  = 0;
    m[3]  = 0;

    m[4]  = 0;
    m[5]  = h;
    m[6]  = 0;
    m[7]  = 0;

    m[8]  = 0;
    m[9]  = 0;
    m[10] = q;
    m[11] = qn;

    m[12] = 0;
    m[13] = 0;
    m[14] = -1;
    m[15] = 0;
    return m;
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't know if you're uploading m straight to OpenGL, but your matrix looks transposed of what a matrix would typically look like in OpenGL.

A non-transposed matrix is laid out like this:

0   4   8  12
1   5   9  13
2   6  10  14
3   7  11  15

So the -1 term should be m[11], etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I really don't understand why you would lay them out in that order but it works! I just had to change my translate and multiply function aswell. –  Vejto Nov 13 '12 at 7:08
    
Yeah, OpenGL uses column-major ordering, you're probably used to row-major. I've had this bite me more than once before. –  MikeMx7f Nov 13 '12 at 20:29

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