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I recently found one of my fellow programmers wrote something like:

int foo()
{
    //some code
    {
        //some code
    }
    //some code
    {
        //some code
    }
    //some code
}

As you can see, the two inner pairs of curling braces serve only to logically separate two blocks of code. Although I have written C for some time, I never really saw such style. Is this considered a good, or, at least, an acceptable style in C?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I don't think this is a particularly good style - it superfluously increases indentation, leaves less space for a line and in parallel, it decreases readability. If you have several "logic modules", you can either separare them using an empty line, like

/* declarations */
char *str;
size_t size;

/* allocate memory */
size = 16;
str = malloc(size);
if (str == NULL) {
    return -1;
}

/* do actual task */

etc. Or, if you have large chunks of code, you should consider refactoring it and breaking them up into separate functions.

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braces introduce a nested scope where you can, for example, use the same variable name again, I've never really needed it, I think it shows poor coding and confuses whoever reads the code.

int foo()
{
    int a;
    //some code
    {
        int a;
    }
}
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This is often done in order to limit the scope of variables, and can make your program use less memory.

EDIT: As @DCoder points out, your compiler most likely makes this unnecessary these days and perhaps your friend is using techniques that he learned long ago when there was more need for it.

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1  
How does this make a program use less memory? –  user529758 Nov 13 '12 at 6:26
4  
I would expect a competent compiler to notice the non-overlapping variable uses and improve memory usage by itself, without requiring hand-holding like this. –  DCoder Nov 13 '12 at 6:26
    
@H2CO3: Each set of braces creates a new scope, and if you are allocating a large amount of memory that isn't needed for the entire function you can limit it to the one area. DCoder: This may or may not be true based on the compiler, but is a good point. –  lnafziger Nov 13 '12 at 6:28
    
@lnafziger I'm aware of variable scopes, however, you should not do a hack like this. One, it's likely to be done by the compiler, two, if you have something like an array of one million long longs, then you should definitely mallocate memory for it on the heap and not stuff up the stack. –  user529758 Nov 13 '12 at 6:30
    
@H2CO3: I'm sure that you are aware of variable scopes, but you did ask an obvious question. Your second point is very valid, however I have seen "hacks" like this used quite often in the past before compilers were quite as smart. –  lnafziger Nov 13 '12 at 6:32

Generally, no this isn't good style. Also, declaring a variable inside an inner scope will (should) not lead to more efficient stack usage: any decent compiler will optimize that away. They have been able to so since C++, which allows variable declarations anywhere, became popular in the early 90s.

Declaring a variable inside an inner scope will however reduce "namespace pollution" of other scopes. As a rule of thumb, a variable should preferably only be visible to the scope where it is used.

Because of this, there are some exceptions where braces would be considered good style, in my opinion. The most obvious case is the switch statement in C90:

switch(x)
{
  case 1:
  {
    /* now you can declare local variables here */
    int my_local;

    break;
  }

  case 2:
  {
    int some_other_local_only_related_to_case_2;

    break;
  }
}
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If you keep the number of those braces low then it's ok, I've done it.

BUT, now I'd say break the code into smaller functions, with names/descriptions. It's a lot better way.

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If the code you are putting in {} can stand on its own it may be worth putting that code into a function, even if it is a void function. That way the namespace of variables used in that function is limited and you segment your code into more manageable pieces. I do this all the time to organize my code and keep it readable / easy to maintain.

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