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I ran into a very strange problem. I think I am missing some very basic thing here. When I do this:

    char buffer[1] = {0xA0};
    int value=0;
    value = (int)buffer[0];
    printf("Array : %d\n",value); 

I get result as -96, which shouldnt happen. It should give me 160, as hexa number 0xA0 means 160 in decimal. When I put small values in buffer like 0x1F, it works fine. Can anyone tell me what am I missing here?

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1  
0xA0 == -96 as an 8-bit signed value. –  Jan Dvorak Nov 13 '12 at 6:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

char is signed -128 to 127

Declare buffer as unsigned char or cast to unsigned char:

char buffer[1] = {0xA0};
int value=0;
value = (unsigned char)buffer[0];
printf("Array : %d\n",value); 
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Then if I want 160, but I have to use char. Is there a workaround? –  UnderDog Nov 13 '12 at 6:30
1  
@UnderDog cast to unsigned char, then int, perhaps? –  Jan Dvorak Nov 13 '12 at 6:31
    
Actually there is a work around. If I make unsigned char, it works like a charm. #just noticed –  UnderDog Nov 13 '12 at 6:31
1  
Char being signed on this particular machine is indeed the source of the problem. However this answer falsely suggests that this is always the case. –  Antoine Mathys Nov 13 '12 at 7:42
1  
you're a real barrel of laughs aren't you? As you stated, it's implementation dependent, and in this case it's the right answer. –  Mitch Wheat Nov 13 '12 at 7:50

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