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I'm starting to get the hang of Codeigniter, but apparently am missing something here.

I'm not sure how to return data to the user after an ajax form submission. Here are the relevant bits of my code, with the question inside:

View:

if (confirm("Are you sure?"))
    {
        var form_data = $('form').serialize();

        $.post("<?php echo site_url();?>" + "/products/update_multiple", (form_data),
// this is what I don't understand: how to populate the variable result with data returned from the model/controller?
           function(result) {
                    $('#myDiv').html(result);
            }
            )
    }

Controller:

function update_multiple()
{

 $this->load->model('products_model');
 $this->products_model->updateMultiple();
// What goes here, to grab data from the model and send it back to the ajax caller?
}

Model:

function updateMultiple()
{
// I have a drop down list to select the field to update. The values of the drop down list look like this: "TableName-FieldName". Hence the explode.

    $table_field = explode("-",$this->input->post('field'));
    $table = $table_field[0];
    $field = $table_field[1];

    $data = $this->input->post('data');

    $rows = explode("\n", $data);

    foreach($rows as $key => $row)
    {
        $values = explode(" ", $row);
        $arr[$key]["code"] = $values[0];
        $arr[$key][$field] = $values[1];
    }


   if ($this->db->update_batch($table, $arr, 'code'))
   {
       // Here is the problem. What should I return here, so that it would be sent back to the calling ajax, to populate the result variable?
   }

}
share|improve this question
    
just echo "success" at end of your controller method and you will get way to handle this –  GBD Nov 13 '12 at 7:34
    
read this: ibm.com/developerworks/web/library/wa-aj-codeigniter –  GBD Nov 13 '12 at 7:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Return json

   if ($this->db->update_batch($table, $arr, 'code'))
  {
   print json_encode(array("status"=>"success","message"=>"Your message here"));
  }

jQuery inside your confirm function

$.ajax({
type: "POST",
url: "<?php echo site_url();?>" + "/products/update_multiple",
data:  $('form').serialize(),
    dataType: "json",
    success: function(content) {
    if (content.status == "success") {
       $('#myDiv').html(content.message);
    } 
        }
    });
share|improve this answer
    
why not to use proper HTTP code, like 200 for success ? List of all codes is available for example on wikipedia –  mkk Nov 13 '12 at 7:43
    
Is it really relevant? If the function succeeds that's all that really matters no? If it doesn't you can always return error with the message of WHY it failed with this way of doing it. HTTP codes won't give you why a query failed –  Rick Calder Nov 13 '12 at 7:44
1  
Please note Deprecation Notice: The jqXHR.success(), jqXHR.error(), and jqXHR.complete() callbacks will be deprecated in jQuery 1.8. To prepare your code for their eventual removal, use jqXHR.done(), jqXHR.fail(), and jqXHR.always() instead. –  itachi Nov 13 '12 at 7:48
    
@rick are you sure? Each code has explanation. Besides, you can add your custom message too, can't you? the only difference is that you will not have to include status => 'success' and this ugly string comparison in javascript –  mkk Nov 13 '12 at 7:49
    
@mkk that string comparision is unnecessary indeed. there is already a fail() in case of error messages. –  itachi Nov 13 '12 at 7:51

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