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I have a very unique situation.

We use a Cisco Web VPN (don't know the exact name) here at work.

If I try to use the web pages I've developed, the javascript is broken.

I have tracked it down to this:

When using the Cisco Web VPN it will actually rewrite some of the HTML/JavaScript code. For instance, at the very beginning of the source it has stuck the following:

<script  id='CSCO_GHOST' src="/+CSCOL+/cte.js"></script>

This is directly after the <html> begin tag (and not inside the <head> tags).

Inside of that source, cte.js, there is an error. That error is causing jQuery to not function properly. cte.js is part of Cisco's product and is totally out of my control.

I know how to capture errors with the windows.onerror but that is not working for this situation. The error is occurring before my scripts are loaded into the page.

Any ideas on how to suppress this error or work around such a thing?

I had my <script> tags in the <head> and then moved them to the bottom of the <body> and in neither place does it make a difference.

UPDATE: After a bit more looking, it is something in jQuery. I commented out the <script> tag for jQuery and the error did not happen. Uncommented, the error came back.

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What is the specific error? It might be possible to work around in some way. –  VoteyDisciple Aug 26 '09 at 15:52
    
They have this code: name.toLowerCase() and name is null. –  hobbyman Aug 26 '09 at 15:58
    
I guess I should have said that the error that is thrown is: name is undefined. They didn't check that before calling the toLowerCase(). –  hobbyman Aug 26 '09 at 16:03
1  
As a side note, I hope your IT department has upgraded, because cte.js contains a flaw that allows a remote cross-site scripting attack. osvdb.org/show/osvdb/55575 –  Nate Aug 26 '09 at 16:04
    
It would be helpful to see chunk of code where that name.toLowerCase() is used. You can try debugging it to see why name is undefined and what exactly caused it (by looking through the call stack). –  kangax Aug 27 '09 at 2:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is what I had to do to fix the problem. I created a JS file in my web project with the following code:

   if ( typeof SegmentHtml != "undefined" ) {
      SegmentHtmlParam.prototype['filter'] = function() {
         var name = null;
         var value = null;
         for (var i = 1; i < this._tokens.length; i++) {
            var token = this._tokens[i];
            if (token.type === ATTR_NAME) {
               name = csco_g_buffer.substring(token.first_index, token.last_index).toUpperCase();
            } else if (token.type === ATTR_VALUE) {
               value = csco_g_buffer.substring(token.first_index, token.last_index);
            };
         };
         var need_processing = false;
         if (ParserClsidName) {
            var tmp = ParserClsidName[this._clsid];
            if (tmp) {
               var proc = tmp[name];
               need_processing = typeof proc != 'undefined';
            };
         };
         /**
         * ERROR ON NEXT LINE: name is null
         */
         if (name!=null && name.toLowerCase() == "csco_proto") {
            this._parent['csco_proto'] = value;
         };
         if (need_processing) { this._parent[name] = value; };
      };    
   };

This is the FIRST javascript file I include in my HTML file.

<script type="text/javascript" src="js/jQueryCiscoKludge.js"></script>
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BTW - I would have not been able to find this bug without the use of the new debugger in IE8. FireBug never caught this error but the IE8 debugger did. –  hobbyman Sep 23 '09 at 10:44

I am running into this issue as well. It is really messed up for Cisco to just rewrite JS code like that, assuming it'll work for every single code on the web. There are some serious irreversible consequence like scope loss that will screw everything up. Who in their right mind would do that in the name of "security"? And what is preventing us from overriding the JS code they have injected?

share|improve this answer
    
That is exactly what I had to do to work around the error, override one of their own functions. –  hobbyman Sep 12 '09 at 11:16
    
hobbyman, could you elaborate which function you overwrite? They seem to be mangling jQuery in a lot of places, how do you know which one to fix? Thanks! –  pixelfreak Sep 15 '09 at 6:31

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